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Mental & Emotional Affects of
Abuse on Children

Authored & Edited by
egypt

 

1.       that helps determine what was used by CPS in child removal

2.      Helps with a lawsuit against CPS

 

From Child Welfare Information Gateway:

http://www.childwelfare.gov/

 

 

What is Child Abuse and Neglect?

Series Title:

Factsheets

Author(s):

Child Welfare Information Gateway

Availability:

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Year Published:

2006 - 4 pages

 

3.      This fact sheet explains how child maltreatment is defined in federal and state laws. Distinctions between the federal Child Abuse Prevention and Treatment Act and state civil and criminal statutes are highlighted. Operational definitions of physical abuse, child neglect, sexual abuse, and emotional abuse also are included.

 

Recognizing Child Abuse and Neglect: Signs and Symptoms

Series Title:

Factsheets

Author(s):

Child Welfare Information Gateway

Availability:

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Year Published:

2006 - 4 pages

 

The first step in helping abused or neglected children is learning to recognize the signs of child abuse and neglect. This fact sheet lists general signs that may signal the presence of child abuse. It also includes signs associated with specific types of abuse such as physical abuse, neglect, sexual abuse, and emotional maltreatment.

 

Understanding the Effects of Maltreatment on Early Brain Development

Series Title:

Bulletins for Professionals

Author(s):

Child Welfare Information Gateway

Availability:

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Year Published:

2001 - 14 pages

 

This In Focus report provides an overview of early brain development and examines how child abuse can impair cognitive and emotional functioning. The specific effects of stress, persistent fear response, hyperarousal, dissociation, disrupted attachment process, and neglect are discussed. The briefing reviews the implications of research findings for the child welfare system, practitioners, and caregivers. Early intervention and prevention strategies are suggested

 

Silent Realities: Supporting Young Children and Their Families Who Experience Violence

Author(s):

Cohen, Walthall

Availability:

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Availability in Spanish:

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Year Published:

2003 - 30 pages

 

This guide describes the effects of trauma on young children and suggests strategies for helping victims and witnesses of community and domestic violence to heal. Based on concepts presented by experts attending an institute held during a National Head Start Association training conference in April 2000, the discussion emphasizes the importance of encouraging children and adults to express their fears. Teachers and other adults are encouraged to identify changes in children's typical behavior and provide opportunities for them to communicate their feelings through art, stories, and drama. Adults also should ensure that children feel safe and in control. The experts ...

 

Dealing With Temper Tantrums (from Promoting Healthy Families in Your Community : 2008 Resource Packet)

Author(s):

Child Welfare Information Gateway, Children's Bureau, FRIENDS National Resource Center For Community-Based Child Abuse Prevention

Availability:

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Year Published:

2008 - 1 pages

 

A young child's tantrums can be stressful for parents. This tip sheet helps parents understand why toddlers have tantrums, what they can do to help prevent tantrums, and how to handle them calmly when they occur.

 

Children exposed to community violence or war/terrorism : Special Issue of Clinical child and family psychology review.

Author(s):

Prinze

Availability:

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Year Published:

2003 - 91 pages

 

This issue of Clinical Child and Family Psychology Review addresses the current status of knowledge as well as critical research needs in the area of children exposed to violence outside the family. Although much has been learned in recent years about children exposed to violence, significant research gaps remain, the identification of which may help to build a more complete and rigorous science base in this area. This journal issue represents the distillation of a 3-day workshop on children exposed to violence, held in July of 2002, that identified what is known about children exposed to violence and what this ...

 

From Child Welfare Information Gateway:  http://www.childwelfare.gov/catalog/index.cfm?event=catalog.viewIndex&letter=B&page=2

 

Bonding With Your Baby (from Promoting Healthy Families in Your Community : 2008 Resource Packet)

Author(s):

Child Welfare Information Gateway, Children's Bureau, FRIENDS National Resource Center For Community-Based Child Abuse Prevention

Availability:

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Year Published:

2008 - 1 pages

 

Strong bonds between babies and caregivers help babies' bodies and brains grow. This tip sheet helps parents understand normal infant behavior, the importance of nurturing and attachment, and what parents can do to develop strong bonds with their babies.

From Child Welfare Information Gateway: 
http://cbexpress.acf.hhs.gov/articles.cfm?issue_id=2007-03&article_id=1292#2

Resources on Child Traumatic Stress

Child traumatic stress, particularly as experienced by children involved in the child welfare system, is the focus of the Winter 2007 issue of the online journal Focal Point. The articles discuss a range of topics, including causes and definitions of child traumatic stress, the psychological and physiological effects of multiple traumatic stress experiences, evidence-based treatment strategies, and early intervention as prevention.

Focal Point is a publication of the Research and Training Center on Family Support and Children’s Mental Health at Portland State University. The entire issue or individual articles are available for PDF download:

www.rtc.pdx.edu/pgFPW07TOC.php

Note for Below:  The Appendix A on Crime Compensation is included for your information.  When convicted of child abuse, the alleged perpetrator can be ordered to pay for counseling for the victim.  It is not known if this information is useful to a person on the Central Registry, or not – specifically, can the file be obtained from the “State Victims of Crimes Programs” and/or can the record be expunged.

 

From: http://www.childwelfare.gov/

The Importance of Fathers in the Healthy Development of Children

Author(s):

Office on Child Abuse and Neglect
Rosenberg, Wilcox

Availability:

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Year Published:

2006 - 125 pages

 

To carry out their responsibilities of protecting children at risk of maltreatment, CPS caseworkers must effectively engage families that often both present and face great challenges. These can include substance abuse, mental health problems, economic stress, unemployment, separation and divorce, inadequate housing, crime, and incarceration. Figuring out how best to work with and engage these families, always with the safety of and permanency for the child as the goal, is not easy. This manual also speaks to both the opportunities and challenges presented by one participant in the family sagas that CPS caseworkers deal with everyday: the father. Working with ...

 

The Role of Mental Health Professionals in the Prevention and Treatment of Child Abuse and Neglect

 

User Manual Series (1993)

Author(s):  U.S. Department of Health and Human Services
Peterson, Urquiza

Year Published:  1993

Protecting Children in Military Families: A Cooperative Response

 

Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy: Addressing the Mental Health of Sexually Abused Children

Series Title:

Bulletins for Professionals

Author(s):

Child Welfare Information Gateway

Availability:

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Year Published:

2007 - 14 pages

 

Trauma-focused cognitive behavioral therapy (TF-CBT) has been found to reduce children?s negative emotional and behavioral responses after sexual abuse and other traumatic events. It also helps nonoffending parents cope with their own distress and develop skills to support their children. This issue brief explores the characteristics and benefits of TF-CBT to help child welfare caseworkers and other professionals who work with at-risk families make more informed decisions about when to refer children and their caregivers to TF-CBT programs. It includes information about what makes TF-CBT unique, key components, target population, effectiveness, and what to look for in a TF-CBT therapist.

 

It is felt by many that CPS, itself, inflicts child abuse & neglect:

From: http://childwelfare.gov/

 

Long-Term Consequences of Child Abuse and Neglect

Series Title:

Factsheets

Author(s):

Child Welfare Information Gateway

Availability:

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Availability in Spanish:

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Year Published:

2006 - 8 pages

 

The impact of child abuse and neglect is often discussed in terms of physical, psychological, behavioral, and societal consequences. In reality, however, it is impossible to separate them completely. Physical consequences (such as damage to a child's growing brain) can have psychological implications (cognitive delays or emotional difficulties, for example.). Psychological problems often manifest as high-risk behaviors. Depression and anxiety, for example, may make a person more likely to smoke, abuse alcohol or illicit drugs, or overeat. High-risk behaviors, in turn, can lead to long-term physical health problems such as sexually transmitted diseases, cancer, and obesity. This fact sheet provides ...

 

Parent-Child Interaction Therapy With At-Risk Families

Series Title:

Issue Briefs

Author(s):

Child Welfare Information Gateway

Availability:

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Year Published:

2007 - 14 pages

 

Parent-child interaction therapy (PCIT) is a family-centered treatment approach demonstrated effective for abused and at-risk children ages 2˝ to 12 and their parents or caregivers. This issue brief explores the characteristics and benefits of PCIT to help child welfare caseworkers, other professionals who work with at-risk families, and caregivers make more informed decisions about family participation in PCIT programs. It includes information about what makes PCIT unique, key components, effectiveness, and what to look for in a PCIT therapist.

 

Parenting the Adopted Adolescent

Series Title:

Factsheets for Families

Author(s):

Child Welfare Information Gateway

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Year Published:

1995 - 11 pages

 

This fact sheet explores the effect of adoption on adolescent development and behavior. Identity formation, fear of abandonment, issues of control, feelings of not belonging, and desires to connect with birth families are described. The briefing also reviews the reactions of teens who were adopted at an older age and provides suggestions for parental response to problems. A list of training programs and materials is attached to the factsheet.

 

Parenting the Sexually Abused Child

Series Title:

Factsheets for Families

Author(s):

Child Welfare Information Gateway

Availability:

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Year Published:

1990 - 11 pages

 

Written for prospective and adoptive parents, this fact sheet describes the effects of sexual abuse and provides recommendations for caring for sexually abused children. Topics covered include the physical and behavioral signs of abuse, issues for boys, contributors to juvenile sex offending, and typical reactions to abuse. Bonding in the adoptive family also is discussed. The fact sheet provides a list of recommended publications for parents and professionals.

 

Treatment for Abused and Neglected Children: Infancy to Age 18

Author(s):

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services
Urquiza, Winn

Availability:

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Year Published:

1994 - 134 pages

 

This manual, produced by NCCAN as part of the User Manual Series, provides an overview of the treatment of sexually abused, physically abused, and neglected children. Child development is briefly reviewed and the study of developmental psychopathology is described. All aspects of child development are considered, including intrapersonal development, interpersonal development, physical development, sexual development, and behavioral conduct development. Consequences of abuse and neglect, assessment of maltreatment, the therapeutic process and the role of the therapist, treatment issues and specialized interventions, and case management are addressed. The manual provides a glossary of terms and list of resources for more detailed ...

 

Long-Term Consequences of Child Abuse and Neglect

Series Title:

Factsheet

Author(s):

Child Welfare Information Gateway

Availability:

View Publication
Printable Version (PDF - 249 KB)
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Year Published:

2006 - 8 pages

The impact of child abuse and neglect is often discussed in terms of physical, psychological, behavioral, and societal consequences. In reality, however, it is impossible to separate them completely. Physical consequences (such as damage to a child's growing brain) can have psychological implications (cognitive delays or emotional difficulties, for example.). Psychological problems often manifest as high-risk behaviors. Depression and anxiety, for example, may make a person more likely to smoke, abuse alcohol or illicit drugs, or overeat. High-risk behaviors, in turn, can lead to long-term physical health problems such as sexually transmitted diseases, cancer, and obesity. This fact sheet provides ...  

Appendix A : Crime Victim Compensation And Victim Assistance

State Victims Of Crime Programs

Alabama

Victim Compensation

Victim Assistance

Executive Director
Alabama Crime Victims Compensation Commission
645 S. McDonough Street
P.O. Box 1548
Montgomery, AL 36102-1548
205.242.4007
FAX 205.240.3328

Director
Alabama Department of Economic and Community Affairs
Law Enforcement Planning Division
401 Adams Avenue
Montgomery, AL 36103-5690
205.242.5100
cc: Section Chief
205.242.5891
FAX 205.242.5515

Alaska

Victim Compensation

Victim Assistance

Administrator
Department of Public Safety
Violent Crimes Compensation Board
P.O. Box 111200
Juneau, AK 99811-1200
907.465.3040

Commissioner
Department of Public Safety
Council on Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault
P.O. Box 111200
Juneau, AK 99811-1200
907.465.4356
cc: Executive Director
FAX 907.465.3627

American Samoa

Victim Compensation

Victim Assistance

No Compensation Program
DC Contact:American Samoa
Federal Program Coordinator
413 Cannon House Office Building
Washington, DC 20515
202.225.8577
FAX 202.225.8757

Director
Department of Human Resources
American Samoa Government
Pago Pago, American Samoa 96799
011.684.633.4485
cc: Social Services Division
011.684.633.2696
FAX 011.684.633.1139

Arizona

Victim Compensation

Victim Assistance

Executive Director
Arizona Criminal Justice Commission
1501 W. Washington, Suite 207
Phoenix, AZ 85007
602.542.1928
cc: Victim Services Coordinator
FAX 602.542.4852

Director
Arizona Department of Public Safety
P.O. Box 6638
Phoenix, AZ 85005
602.223.2000
cc: Fiscal Management and Support
602.223.2491/2650
FAX 602.223.2347

Arkansas

Victim Compensation

Victim Assistance

Attorney General
Office of the Attorney General
Crime Victims Reparations Board
323 Center Street, Suite 601
Little Rock, AR 72201
501.682.1323
cc: Director
FAX 501.682.8084

Prosecutor Coordinator
Prosecutor Coordinator's Office
232 Center Street, Suite 750
Little Rock, AR 72201
501.682.5045
cc: V/W Coordinator
501.682.5045
FAX 501.682.5004

California

Victim Compensation

Victim Assistance

Executive Officer
State of California
State Board of Control
P.O. Box 3036
Sacramento, CA 95812-3036
916.323.6251
cc: Deputy Director
Victims of Crime Program
916.323.6251
FAX 916.327.2933

Executive Director
Office of Criminal Justice Planning
1130 K Street, Suite 300
Sacramento, CA 95814
916.324.9140
916.323.7611
FAX 916.327.8711

Colorado

Victim Compensation

Victim Assistance

Director
Division of Criminal Justice
Department of Public Safety
700 Kipling Street, Suite 3000
Denver, CO 80215
303.239.4442/4451
cc: Criminal Justice Specialist
FAX 303.239.4491

Director
Division of Criminal Justice
Department of Public Safety
700 Kipling Street, Suite 3000
Denver, CO 80215
303.239.4442/4451
cc: Criminal Justice Specialist
FAX 303.239.4485

Connecticut

Victim Compensation

Victim Assistance

Administrator
Commission on Victim Services
1155 Silas Deane Highway
Wethersfield, CT 06109
203.529.3089
FAX 203.721.0593

Under Secretary
Office of Policy and Management
Policy and Planning Division
80 Washington Street
Hartford, CT 06106
203.566.4298
cc: Planning Specialist
FAX 203.566.6295

Delaware

Victim Compensation

Victim Assistance

Executive Director
Delaware Violent Crimes Compensation Board
1500 East Newport Pike, Suite 10
Wilmington, DE 19804
302.995.8383
cc: Support Services Administrator
FAX 302.995.8387

Executive Director
Criminal Justice Council
Carvel State Office Building
820 North French, Fourth Floor
Wilmington, DE 19801
302.577.3437
302.577.3432
FAX 302.577.3440

District of Columbia

Victim Compensation

Victim Assistance

Director
Department of Employment Services
Employment Security Building
500 C Street, N.W., Suite 600
Washington, DC 20001
202.639.1000
Crime Victims' Compensation Program
1200 Upshur Street, N.W., Suite 100
Washington, DC 20001
202.576.7090
FAX 202.576.7282

Director
Department of Human Services
801 North Capitol Street, N.W.
Washington, DC 20002
202.727.0310
cc: Director
Crime Victim Assistance Center
First and I Streets, S.W., Room 116
Washington, DC 20024
202.842.8467

Florida

Victim Compensation

Victim Assistance

Chief and Director
2012 Capital Circle, S.E.
Hartman Building, Room 104
The Capitol
Tallahassee, FL 32399-1050
904.488.0848
FAX 904.487.1595

Director
Office of the Attorney General
Division of Victims Services and Criminal Justice Programs
The Capitol
Tallahassee, FL 32399-1050
904.488.0848
904.487.4760
FAX 904.487.1595

Georgia

Victim Compensation

Victim Assistance

Director
Georgia Crime Victims Compensation Program
Criminal Justice Coordinating Council
503 Oak Place, Suite 540
Atlanta, GA 30349
404.559.4949
cc: Program Director

Director
Criminal Justice Coordinating Council
503 Oak Place, Suite 540
Atlanta, GA 30349
404.559.4949
FAX 404.559.4960

Guam

Victim Compensation

Victim Assistance

No Compensation Program

Attorney General
Department of Law
Government of Guam
2-200 East Guam Judicial Center
120 West O'Brien Drive
Agana, GU 96910
011.671.475.3406
FAX 011.671.472.2493

Hawaii

Victim Compensation

Victim Assistance

Attorney General
Resource Coordination Division
425 Queen Street, Room 221
Honolulu, HI 96813
808.586.1154
cc: Administrator
FAX 808.548.1900
cc: Director
Crime Victims Compensation
808.587.1143

Attorney General
Department of the Attorney General
425 Queen Street, Room 221
Honolulu, HI 96813
808.586.1282
cc: Administrator
FAX 808.548.1900

Idaho

Victim Compensation

Victim Assistance

Executive Director
Crime Victims Compensation Program
c/o Idaho Industrial Commission
317 Main Street
Boise, ID 83720
208.334.6000
cc: Manager
Victim Compensation Program
FAX 208.334.2321

Executive Director
Idaho Department of Health and Welfare
Council on Domestic Violence
450 West State Street
Boise, ID 83720-9990
208.334.5580
FAX 208.334.5694

Illinois

Victim Compensation

Victim Assistance

Deputy Clerk
Illinois Court of Claims
630 South College Street
Springfield, IL 62756
217.782.7101
cc: Chief
Crime Victims Division
Office of the Attorney General
100 West Randolph, 13th
Chicago, IL 60601
312.814.2581

Executive Director
Illinois Criminal Justice Information Authority
120 South Riverside Plaza, Tenth Floor
Chicago, IL 60606
312.793.8550
cc: Program Supervisor
FAX 312.793.8422

Indiana

Victim Compensation

Victim Assistance

Acting Director
Violent Crimes Compensation Bureau
Indiana Government Center, South
402 West Washington Street, Room W382
Indianapolis, IN 46204
317.232.7103
FAX 317.232.4331

Executive Director
Indiana Criminal Justice Institute
302 West Washington Street, E209
Indianapolis, IN 46204
317.232.1233
cc: V/A Grant Coordinator
317.232.1233

Iowa

Victim Compensation

Victim Assistance

Attorney General
Office of the Attorney General
Hoover State Office Building
Des Moines, IA 50191
515.242.6110
cc: Deputy Director
Iowa Department of Justice
Crime Victim Assistance Program
Old Historical Building
Des Moines, IA 50319
FAX 515.281.8199

Attorney General
Office of the Attorney General
Hoover State Office Building
Des Moines, IA 50191
515.242.6109
cc: Administrator
Iowa Department of Justice
Crime Victim Assistance Program
Old Historical Building
Des Moines, IA 50319
FAX 515.281.8199

Kansas

Victim Compensation

Victim Assistance

Attorney General
Office of the Attorney General
Kansas Crime Victims Compensation Board
Jayhawk Tower, Suite 400
700 Southwest Jackson
Topeka, KS 66603-3741
913.296.2359
cc: Director
FAX 913.296.0652

Secretary
Department of Social and Rehabilitation Services
Crime Victim Assistance Program
Docking State Office Building
915 Southwest Harrison, Room 600 North
Topeka, KS 66612-1570
913.296.3271
cc: Community Resource Development
SRS-Youth and Adult Services
Smith/Wilson Building
300 Southwest Oakley
Topeka, KS 66606
913.296.7465
FAX 913.296.4649

Kentucky

Victim Compensation

Victim Assistance

Executive Director
Crime Victims Compensation Board
115 Myrtle Avenue
Frankfort, KY 40601-3113
502.564.7986
FAX 502.564.3151

Secretary
Kentucky Justice Cabinet
Bush Building
403 Wapping Street, Second Floor
Frankfort, KY 40601
502.564.7554
cc: VOCA Program Director
FAX 502.564.6615

Louisiana

Victim Compensation

Victim Assistance

Executive Director
Crime Victims Reparations Program
Louisiana Commission on Law Enforcement
1885 Wooddale Boulevard, Suite 708
Baton Rouge, LA 70806-1442
504.925.1997
cc: Program Manager
504.925.4437
FAX 504.925.1998

Executive Director
Louisiana Commission on Law Enforcement
1885 Wooddale Boulevard, Suite 708
Baton Rouge, LA 70806-1442
504.925.1997
cc: Program Specialist
504.925.4437
FAX 504.925.1998

Maine

Victim Compensation

Victim Assistance

Office of the Attorney General
State House Station 6
Augusta, ME 04333
207.626.8500

Commissioner
Maine Department of Human Services
Division of Purchased and Support Services
State House Station 11
Augusta, ME 04333
207.289.2736
cc: Evaluation Manager
207.289.5060

Maryland

Victim Compensation

Victim Assistance

Secretary
Department of Public Safety and Correctional Services Criminal Injuries Compensation Board
6776 Reisterstown Road, Suite 313
Baltimore, MD 21215-2340
410.764.4078
cc: Director
410.764.4214

Secretary
State of Maryland Department of Human Resources
311 West Saratoga Street, Room 239
Baltimore, MD 21201
410.333.0059
cc: Director
Women's Services Programs
Community Services Administration
FAX 410.333.0392

Massachusetts

Victim Compensation

Victim Assistance

Attorney General
Department of the Attorney General
One Ashburton Place, Room 1800
Boston, MA 02108-1698
617.727.2200
cc: Chief
Victim Compensation Division
Office of the Attorney General
One Ashburton Place, Room 1811
Boston, MA 02108-1698
617.727.2200 ext. 2875
FAX 617.727.3251

Executive Director
The Commonwealth of Massachusetts
Victim and Witness Assistance Board
Massachusetts Office for Victims Assistance
100 Cambridge Street, Room 1104
Boston, MA 02202
617.727.5200
cc: Grant Manager
FAX 617.727.6522

Michigan

Victim Compensation

Victim Assistance

Administrator
Crime Victims Compensation Board
P.O. Box 30026
Lansing, MI 48909
517.373.0979
320 South Walnut
1st Floor North
Lansing, MI 48933
FAX 517.373.1071

Director
Grants Management Division
Office of Contract Management
P.O. Box 30026
Lansing, MI 48909
517.373.6655
517.373.1826
FAX 517.335.2355

Minnesota

Victim Compensation

Victim Assistance

Commissioner
Department of Public Safety
Department of Transportation Building
Room 211, John Ireland Boulevard
St. Paul, MN 55155
612.296.6642
cc: Executive Director
Crime Victims Reparation Board
Griggs-Midway Building
1821 University Avenue, N-465
St. Paul, MN 55104
612.649.5993
FAX 612.645.0963

Commissioner
Department of Corrections
300 Bigelow Building
450 North Syndicate Street
St. Paul, MN 55104
612.642.0395
612.642.0221
FAX 612.642.0223

Mississippi

Victim Compensation

Victim Assistance

Director
Department of Finance and Administration
Box 267
Jackson, MS 39205
601.359.6766
cc: Hearing Officer
601.359.6766
FAX 601.359.2470

Director
Department of Public Safety
Division of Public Safety Planning
301 West Pearl Street
Jackson, MS 39203
601.949.2225
FAX 601.960.4263

Missouri

Victim Compensation

Victim Assistance

Director
Division of Workers' Compensation
Crime Victims Compensation
P.O. Box 58
Jefferson City, MO 65102
314.751.4231
cc: Supervisor
3315 West Truman Boulevard
FAX 314.751.2012

Director
Department of Public Safety
Truman Building, Room 870
P.O. Box 749
Jefferson City, MO 65102-0749
314.751.4905
cc: Program Specialist

Montana

Victim Compensation

Victim Assistance

Administrator
Board of Crime Control Division
Crime Victims Unit
Scott Hart Building
303 North Roberts, Fourth Floor
Helena, MT 59620-1408
406.444.3605
cc: Administrative Officer
406.444.3653
FAX 406.444.4722

Administrator
Board of Crime Control Division
Crime Victims Unit
Scott Hart Building
303 North Roberts, Fourth Floor
Helena, MT 59620-1408
406.444.3605
cc: Victim Coordinator
406.444.3604/2649
FAX 406.444.4722

Nebraska

Victim Compensation

Victim Assistance

Executive Director
Nebraska Crime Victims Reparation Board
Nebraska Commission on Law Enforcement and Criminal Justice
301 Centennial Mall South
P.O. Box 94946
Lincoln, NE 68509
402.471.2194
cc: Federal Aid Administration
402.471.2194

Executive Director
Nebraska Crime Victims Reparation Board
Nebraska Commission on Law Enforcement and Criminal Justice
301 Centennial Mall South
P.O. Box 94946
Lincoln, NE 68509
402.471.2194
cc: Federal Aid Administration
FAX 402.471.2837

Nevada

Victim Compensation

Victim Assistance

Director
Nevada Department of Administration
Capitol Complex
209 East Musser, Room 204
Carson City, NV 89710
702.687.4065

Director
Nevada Department of Human Resources
505 East King Street, Room 600
Carson City, NV 89710
702.687.5943
FAX 702.687.4773

New Hampshire

Victim Compensation

Victim Assistance

Director of Administration
New Hampshire Department of Justice
25 Capitol Street, State House Annex
Concord, NH 03301-6397
603.271.3658
cc: Victims' Compensation Coordinator
603.271.1284
FAX 201.648.3937

Director of Administration
New Hampshire Department of Justice
State House Annex
25 Capitol Street
Concord, NH 03301-6397
603.271.3658
603.271.1297
FAX 603.271.2361

New Jersey

Victim Compensation

Victim Assistance

Chairman
Violent Crimes Compensation Board
60 Park Place, 20th Floor
Newark, NJ 07102
201.648.2107
cc: Board Accountant
201.648.2107, ext. 25/20
FAX 201.648.3937

Attorney General
New Jersey Department of Law and Public Safety
Division of Criminal Justice
Office of Victim/Witness Advocacy
25 Market Street, CN 085
Trenton, NJ 08625-0085
609.984.4499

New Mexico

Victim Compensation

Victim Assistance

Director
New Mexico Crime Victims Reparation Commission
8100 Mountain Road, N.E., Suite 106
Albuquerque, NM 87110
505.841.9432
FAX 505.841.9435

Director
New Mexico Crime Victims Reparation Commission
8100 Mountain Road, N.E., Suite 106
Albuquerque, NM 87110
505.841.9432
FAX 505.841.9435

New York

Victim Compensation

Victim Assistance

Chairman
Crime Victims Board
270 Broadway, Room 200
New York, NY 10007
212.417.5133
cc: Administrative Officer
New York Crime Victims Board
845 Central Avenue, South 3, Suite 107
Albany, NY 12206
518.457.8063
FAX 518.457.8658

Chairman
Crime Victims Board
270 Broadway, Room 200
New York, NY 10007
212.417.5133
FAX 212.587.5133
cc: Director
New York Crime Victims Board
845 Central Avenue, South 3, Suite 107
Albany, NY 12206
518.457.1779
FAX 518.457.8658

North Carolina

Victim Compensation

Victim Assistance

Director
North Carolina Victims Compensation Commission
Department of Crime Control and Public Safety
Division of Victim and Justice Services
P.O. Box 27687
Raleigh, NC 27611-7687
919.733.7974
FAX 919.733.0296

Executive Director
Governor's Crime Commission
Department of Crime Control and Public Safety
P.O. Box 27687
Raleigh, NC 27611
919.733.5013
cc: Criminal Justice Planner
FAX 919.733.7585

North Dakota

Victim Compensation

Victim Assistance

Director
Workers Compensation Bureau
Crime Victims Reparation Program
Russel Building, Highway 83 North
4007 North State Street
Bismarck, ND 58501
701.224.3800, 701.224.3770
cc: Administrator
FAX 701.224.3820

Director
Workers Compensation Bureau
Crime Victims Reparation Program
Russel Building, Highway 83 North
4007 North State Street
Bismarck, ND 58501
701.224.3800/3770
cc: Administrator
FAX 701.224.3820

North Mariana Islands

Victim Compensation

Victim Assistance

No Compensation Program

Executive Director
Criminal Justice Planning Agency
P.O. Box 1133 CK
Saipan MP
Saipan, Mariana Islands 96950
011.670.322.9350/6311
cc: Criminal Justice Planner
FAX 011.670.322.6311
DC Area Office
2121 R Street, N.W.
Washington, DC 20008
202.673.5869

Ohio

Victim Compensation

Victim Assistance

Clerk
Victims of Crime Compensation Program
Court of Claims of Ohio
65 East State Street, Suite 1100
614.466.8439
cc: Director
614.466.3345
FAX 614.644.8553

Attorney General
Office of the Attorney General
30 East Board Street, 26th Floor
Columbus, OH 43266-0410
614.466.3376
cc: Executive Director
614.466.5610
FAX 614.466.6090

Oklahoma

Victim Compensation

Victim Assistance

Executive Director
Crime Victims Compensation Board
2200 Classen Boulevard, Suite 1800
Oklahoma City, OK 73106-5811
405.521.2330
cc: Administrator
FAX 405.525.3584

Executive Director
District Attorneys Council
2200 Classen Boulevard, Suite 1800
Oklahoma City, OK 73106-5811
405.521.2349
cc: Administrator
FAX 405.525.3584

Oregon

Victim Compensation

Victim Assistance

Attorney General
Department of Justice
Crime Victims' Compensation Program
240 Cottage Street
Salem, OR 97310
503.378.5348
cc: Director

Program Monitor
The Honorable Charles Crookham
Attorney General
Office of the Attorney General
Special Compensation Program
100 Justice Building
Salem, OR 97310
503.378.5348
cc: Director
503.373.1936

Palau

Victim Compensation

Victim Assistance

No Compensation Program
DC Contact
444 North Capitol Street, N.W.
Suite 308
Washington, DC 20001
202.624.7793
FAX 202.624.7795

Vice President
Ministry of Justice
P. O. Box 100
Koror, Palau 96940
680.488.2702
cc: Legal Counsel to the Vice President
D.C. Contact
444 North Capitol Street, N.W., Suite 308
Washington, DC 20001
202.624.7793
FAX 202.624.7795

Pennsylvania

Victim Compensation

Victim Assistance

Chairman
Pennsylvania Crime Victim's Compensation Board
Harristown Building No. 2, Lobby Level
333 Market Street
Harrisburg, PA 17101
717.783.5153

Executive Director
Pennsylvania Commission on Crime and Delinquency
P.O. Box 1167
Federal Square Station
Harrisburg, PA 17108-1167
717.787.8559
cc: Program Manager
FAX 717.783.7713

Puerto Rico

Victim Compensation

Victim Assistance

No Compensation Program

Attorney General
Department of Justice
P.O. Box 192
San Juan, PR 00902
809.725.0335
cc: Director
Planning, Federal, and Statistics Division
809.725.6144

Rhode Island

Victim Compensation

Victim Assistance

State Court Administrator
Rhode Island Supreme Court
State Court Administrative Office
Crime Compensation Program
Licht Judicial Complex
250 Benefit Street
Providence, RI 02903
401.277.3263
cc: State Coordinator
Judicial Planning Section
RI Supreme Court
401.277.2500 x 33
FAX 401.277.3865

Director of Administration
Governor's Justice Commission
Executive Department
222 Quaker Lane, Suite 100
Warwick, RI 02886
401.277.2620
cc: Executive Director
FAX 401.277.1294

Director of Administration
Governor's Justice Commission
Executive Department
222 Quaker Lane, Suite 100
Warwick, RI 02886
401.277.2620
cc: Executive Director
FAX 401.277.1294

South Carolina

Victim Compensation

Victim Assistance

Director
State Office of Victim Assistance
P.O. Box 210009
Columbia, SC 29221-0009
803.737.9465
cc: Deputy Director
803.737.9465
FAX 803.731.1428

Director
Division of Public Safety
Office of the Governor
Edgar Brown Building
1205 Pendleton Street
Columbia, SC 29201
803.734.0425
cc: VOCA Program Coordinator
803.734.0369
FAX 803.734.0486

South Dakota

Victim Compensation

Victim Assistance

Assistant Secretary
South Dakota Department of Corrections
Joe Foss Building
523 East Capitol
Pierre, SD 57501
605.773.3478

Director
Community Assistance Program
South Dakota Department of Commerce and Regulation
910 East Sioux, c/o 500 East Capitol
Pierre, SD 57501-5070
605.773.3177

Tennessee

Victim Compensation

Victim Assistance

State Treasurer
Treasury Department
First Floor, State Capitol
Nashville, TN 37219
615.741.2956
cc: Director
Division of Claims Administration
11th Floor, Andrew Jackson Building
Nashville, TN 37243-0243
615.741.2734
FAX 615.741.7328

Commissioner
Department of Human Services
Citizens Plaza Building
400 Deaderick Street
Nashville, TN 37219
615.741.3241
cc: VOCA Specialist
615.741.5947
FAX 615.741.4165

Texas

Victim Compensation

Victim Assistance

Chief
Crime Victims Compensation Division
Office of the Attorney General
P.O. Box 12548, Capitol Station
Austin, TX 78711-2548
512.462.6414
cc: Assistant Chief
FAX 512.462.6449

Acting Director
Criminal Justice Division
Office of the Governor
P.O. Box 12428
Capitol Station
Austin, TX 78711
512.463.1919
cc: Program Manager
FAX 512.463.1932

Utah

Victim Compensation

Victim Assistance

Director
Office of Crime Victim Reparations
350 East 500 South, Suite 200
Salt Lake City, UT 84111
801.533.4000
FAX 801.533.4127

Director
Office of Crime Victim Reparations
350 East 500 South, Suite 200
Salt Lake City, UT 84111
801.533.4000
cc: Program Coordinator
FAX 801.533.4127

Vermont

Victim Compensation

Victim Assistance

Executive Director
Vermont Crime Victims Compensation Program
P.O. Box 991
Montpelier, VT 05601-0991
802.828.3374

Secretary
Agency of Human Services
103 South Main Street
Waterbury, VT 05676
802.241.2220
cc: Grant Administrator
802.241.2928
Planning Division
FAX 802.244.8103

Virginia

Victim Compensation

Victim Assistance

Chairman
Division of Crime Victim's Compensation
P.O. Box 1794
Richmond, VA 23214
804.367.8686
cc: Director
Division of Crime Victim's Compensation
P.O. Box 5423
Richmond, VA 23220
804.367.8686
FAX 804.367.9740

Director
Department of Criminal Justice Services
805 East Broad Street, Tenth Floor
Richmond, VA 23219
804.786.4000
cc: Program Manager
804.786.4001
FAX 804.371.8981

Virgin Islands

Victim Compensation

Victim Assistance

Executive Secretary
Virgin Island Criminal Victims Compensation Commission
Department of Human Services
Office of the Commissioner
Barbel Plaza South
Charlotte Amalie
St. Thomas, VI 00802
809.774.1166
cc: Administrator
Crime Victim Compensation Commission
FAX 809.774.3466

Governor's Drug Policy Advisor
Law Enforcement Planning Commission
116-164 Submarine Base
Estate Nisky No. 6, Southside Quarters
St. Thomas, VI 00802
809.774.6400
cc: Director
Victim Witness Services
FAX 809.774.1361

Washington

Victim Compensation

Victim Assistance

Director
Crime Victim Compensation Program
Department of Labor and Industries
Olympia, WA 98504
206.753.6307
cc: Program Manager
206.956.5340
Department of Labor and Industries
Crime Victims Compensation Program
7373 Linderson Way, S.W.
P.O. Box 44520
Olympia, WA 98504-4520

Secretary
Department of Social and Health Services
Mail Stop 45710
12th and Jefferson
Olympia, WA 98504-5710
206.753.3395
cc: Program Director
Division of Children and Family Services
206.586.8254
FAX 206.586.5874

West Virginia

Victim Compensation

Victim Assistance

Clerk
West Virginia Court of Claims
Crime Victims Compensation Fund
Room 6, Building 1, State Capitol
Charleston, WV 25305
304.558.3471
304.558.3471
FAX 304.357.7829

Manager
Criminal Justice and Highway Safety Office
West Virginia Development Office
1204 Kanawha Boulevard, East
Charleston, WV 25301
304.558.8814
cc: Federal Program Coordinator
FAX 304.558.0391

Wisconsin

Victim Compensation

Victim Assistance

Attorney General
Department of Justice
123 West Washington Avenue
P.O. Box 7857
Madison, WI 53707-7857
608.266.6470/1221
cc: Executive Director
Office of Crime Victims Services
Department of Justice
P.O. Box 7951
Madison, WI 53707-7951
FAX 608.266.6676

Attorney General
Department of Justice
123 West Washington Avenue
P.O. Box 7857
Madison, WI 53707-7857
608.266.6470/1221
cc: Executive Director
608.266.6470
608.267.2251
FAX 608.267.2223

Wyoming

Victim Compensation

Victim Assistance

Program Manager
Crime Victims Compensation Commission
Office of the Attorney General
1700 Westland
Cheyenne, WY 82001
307.635.4050
FAX 307.777.6869

Program Manager
Crime Victims Compensation Commission
Office of the Attorney General
1700 Westland
Cheyenne, WY 82001
307.635.4050
FAX 307.777.6869

 

Appendix B : Other User Manuals In This Series

 

The following is from Child Welfare Information Gateway.  Since we believe that the CPS system, itself, is abusive of children and causes more damage in removals and system experience than leaving the kids with the family, the following is included here regarding the impact of child abuse:

The Following is From:  http://www.childwelfare.gov/can/impact/

 

Impact

Learn how child abuse and neglect affect children, adolescents, adult survivors, and society. This section examines the impact of abuse and neglect on child development, as well as long-term consequences for adults with a history of abuse. Impact is explored by type of abuse, family factors, and the social and economic consequences.

 

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Selected Resources

Long-Term Consequences of Child Abuse and Neglect
Child Welfare Information Gateway (2006)
Overview of some of the most common physical, psychological, behavioral, and societal consequences of child abuse and neglect. (
PDF - 249 KB)

What Are the Consequences of Child Abuse and Neglect?
Children’s Bureau (HHS) User Manual Series (2003)
In A Coordinated Response to Child Abuse and Neglect: The Foundation for Practice
A discussion of the physical, developmental, psychological, and societal effects of child abuse and neglect.

National Center for Children Exposed to Violence
A comprehensive website providing Internet resources and a bibliographic database of information on the effects of violence exposure on children. The center also provides training and technical assistance to a variety of collaborative community programs that respond to children and families exposed to violence.

The Vortex of Violence: How Children Adapt and Survive in a Violent World (PDF - 223 KB)
Child Trauma Academy (2002)
Discusses the impact of violence on a child’s development, including effects on physical, emotional, behavioral, cognitive, and social functioning, and the transgenerational cycle of violence.

 

 

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Related Information Gateway Topics

Preventing child abuse & neglect
Responding to child abuse & neglect

 

 

 

Objective. Sexual behavior in children can cause uncertainty in the clinician because of the relationship between sexual abuse and sexual behavior. Consequently, it is important to understand normative childhood sexual behavior.

And here is the link: http://www.falseall egations. com/mayo- abs.htm 

Child Trauma Information

Bruce D. Perry, M.D., Ph.D., is an internationally-recognized authority on children in crisis. Dr. Perry is the Provincial Medical Director in Children’s Mental Health for the Alberta Mental Health Board. In addition, he is the Senior Fellow of the ChildTrauma Academy (www.ChildTrauma.org), a Houston-based organization dedicated to research and education on child maltreatment. Dr. Perry has been consulted on many high-profile incidents involving traumatized children, including the Columbine, Colorado school shootings, the Oklahoma City bombing, and the Branch Davidian siege. Click here for advice on teaching about 9/11 from child psychiatrist Dr. Bruce Perry.

Find out when Dr. Perry will be presenting at a conference near you!
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Every year millions of children are physically and emotionally abused. Learn creative and practical approaches to understanding and working with maltreated children via free, online courses at ChildTraumaAcademy.com. Courses are short, self paced and allow you to talk to other students online! Enroll now!

 

 

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Keep the Cool in School

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Keep the Cool in School
In the first of a series of articles about promoting nonviolent behavior in children, Dr. Perry gives an overview of the 6 core strengths that children need in order to be humane.

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Attachment: The First Core Strength
In the second article of the Keep the Cool in School campaign, Dr. Perry discusses attachment and how it contributes to preventing aggression and anti-social behaviors in children.

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Self-Regulation: The Second Core Strength
In the third article of the Keep the Cool in School campaign, Dr. Perry explores self-regulation and how it contributes to preventing aggression and anti-social behaviors in children.

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Affiliation: The Third Core Strength
In the fourth article of the Keep the Cool in School campaign, Dr. Perry shares how educators can help students feel included, connected and valued.

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Awareness: The Fourth Core Strength
In the fifth article of the Keep the Cool in School campaign, Dr. Perry shares ideas about encouraging children to respect and appreciate each other's differences and similarities.

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Tolerance: The Fifth Core Strength
In the sixth article of the Keep the Cool in School campaign, Dr. Perry discusses tolerance, the most complex of the six core strengths.

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Respect: The Sixth Core Strength
In the seventh article of the Keep the Cool in School campaign, Dr. Perry explores how educators can help students accept and enjoy the differences in others.

The Developing Child

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A Place for Everyone: Nurturing Each Child's Niche
One of the many jobs of early childhood educators is to nurture the uniqueness of every child. This article includes tips for identifying a child's individual strengths and needs.

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The Importance of Pleasure in Play
Play, more than any other activity, fuels healthy development of children. In this article, learn strategies for mixing emotional, social, and cognitive challenge with fun.

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Curiosity: The Fuel of Development
For children, the positive cycle of learning is fueled by curiosity, and the pleasure that comes from discovery and mastery. Find out how teachers can help to keep the process going.

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How Sounds Become Words
How is it that words come to have meaning? When does the sound become the word? And how can we help children learn the true meaning of our most important words?

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The Developmental Hot Zone
Helping children move from the comfortable and familiar, and take on new challenges, is a very important task. In this latest article, Dr. Perry outlines strategies for providing the right opportunities for children at the right time, and in the proper sequence.

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The Meaning in Words
In a conversation with Early Childhood Today editor Helen Benham, Dr. Perry explains how children learn to make sense of the language they hear — in conjunction with the actions they see.

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Biological Relativity: Time and the Developing Child
Can mere hours in infancy have more power to shape us than months in middle age?

Children in Distress

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Children and Loss
Teachers serve as a crucial emotional bridge for a child at times of loss. What do we need to know to help students cope, especially in the classroom environment?

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Death and Loss: Helping Children Manage Their Grief
Dr. Perry shares strategies for helping children to adjust to difficult situations such as moving, divorce, and death.

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Bonding and Attachment in Maltreated Children: Consequences of Emotional Neglect in Childhood
Dr. Perry explains why experiences during infancy and early childhood are so critical to shaping our capacity to form emotionally healthy relationships, and how maltreatment can impair this important capability.

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Bonding and Attachment in Maltreated Children: How You Can Help
In this article, Dr. Perry suggests ways that responsive adults, such as parents, teachers, and other caregivers, can make all the difference in the lives of maltreated children.

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Why Does Violence Happen?
Dr. Perry revisits the Columbine High School tragedy one year later. Use this article as a teaching resource to initiate student discussion.

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The Child's Loss: Death, Grief, and Mourning
Find out how teachers, caregivers, and other adults can help children exposed to traumatic death.

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The Impact of Abuse and Neglect on the Developing Brain
Find out how destructive experiences can affect children in far-reaching ways — emotional, behavioral, academic, social, and physical — for life.

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Principles of Working With Traumatized Children
Some special considerations for teachers and caregivers in understanding and working with children who have suffered trauma.

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Aggression and Violence: The Neurobiology of Experience
Over 5 million children are directly exposed to violence in the U.S. each year. What will the impact on our society be? Read on to find out more.

The Brain and Learning

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Attunement: Reading the Rhythms of the Child
Learning about children's individual strengths, vulnerabilities, and preferred styles of communication can help teachers to reach — and teach — each child more effectively.

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Using Technology in the Early Childhood Classroom
In this article, Dr. Perry outlines how computers, the Internet, television, and other technology tools can help children develop curiosity, problem-solving, and independent-thinking skills.

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Creating an Emotionally Safe Classroom
Why are the first days of the new school year so important? Find out what you can do during these first weeks to help new students come to enjoy school and love learning.

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How the Brain Learns Best
In his latest article, Dr. Perry outlines some easy ways to help your students learn optimally in the classroom by helping to activate different parts of the brain.

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A growing list of Web sites, publications, and organizations focusing on helping children in crisis.

 

 

 

 

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