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Standing Helpless

How Your Family is Destroyed With Allegations of Child Abuse

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

"...State child-protection officials say their mission is different from that of the criminal justice system and that they should not be held to a high legal standard. DCFS is protective and supportive, not punitive, they say. As one official put it: "We are expected to go into a home, determine what has happened, and predict what might happen in the future...." ????
(
Quote taken from: Child-abuse claims vs. parents' rights, June 12, 2008, http://www.csmonitor.com/2008/0612/p02s01-usju.html?page=1 )

Related Reading: How to Destroy a Family (http://www.jesus-is-savior.com/Family/how_to_destroy_a_family.htm)

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From Child Welfare Information Gateway:

http://www.childwelfare.gov/
Authored & Edited by
egypt

Program Evaluation: A Synthesis of Lessons Learned by Child Neglect Demonstration Projects

Series Title:

Grantee Lessons Learned

Author(s):

United States. Children's Bureau.

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Year Published:

2005 - 18 pages

 

In 1996 and 1997, the Children's Bureau funded 10 demonstration projects to address the prevention, intervention, and treatment needs of neglected children and their families. These projects implemented and evaluated a wide variety of service strategies with large numbers of high-risk children and families. The programs varied considerably in terms of theoretical model (psychosocial or ecological), target population, location (in-home or out-of-home), duration, and intensity. The projects provided a great variety of services, including parent education and support, home visits, and referrals to other resources or services in the community. (For information about the programmatic aspects of these projects, see ...

 

Infant Safe Haven Laws

Series Title:

State Statutes

Author(s):

Child Welfare Information Gateway

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Year Published:

2007 - 5 pages

 

Reviews State laws that provide a vehicle for the safe relinquishment of newborns who might otherwise be abandoned.

 

Infant Safe Haven Laws: Summary of State Laws

Series Title:

State Statutes

Author(s):

Child Welfare Information Gateway

Availability:

Download Publication (PDF - 660 KB)

Year Published:

2007 - 69 pages

 

Reviews State laws that provide a vehicle for the safe relinquishment of newborns who might otherwise be abandoned. Summaries of laws for all States and US territories are included.

 

Kinship Care/Grandparents Raising Grandchildren

Series Title:

Related Organizations Lists

Author(s):

Child Welfare Information Gateway

Availability:

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Year Published:

2008 - 0 pages

 

This resource listing provides the contact information of selected organizations that offer information on kinship care. Each entry includes a brief description of the function of the organization, mailing address, telephone and fax number, e-mail address, and web address.

 

Kinship Caregivers and the Child Welfare System

Series Title:

Factsheets for Families

Author(s):

Child Welfare Information Gateway

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Year Published:

2005 - 15 pages

 

Informal and formal kinship care arrangements help to ensure stability and protection for children within their extended family. This fact sheet describes the benefits of kinship care as a child protection alternative and examines the agency's responsibility for the placement. The placement decision-making process, what to expect from the child welfare service and court system, and financial support, available services, and permanency planning are discussed. Questions for new kin caregivers to ask and a list of additional references are provided.

 

Parental Drug Use as Child Abuse

Series Title:

State Statutes

Author(s):

Child Welfare Information Gateway

Availability:

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Year Published:

2006 - 4 pages

 

Abuse of drugs or alcohol by parents and other caretakers can have a negative impact on the health , safety, and well-being of children. Approximately 42 States, the District of Columbia, and Guam currently have laws within their child protection statutes that address the issue of substance abuse by parents. Two main areas of concern are (1) the harm caused by prenatal drug exposure and (2) the harm caused to children of any age by exposure to illegal drug activity in the home. The Child Abuse Prevention and Treatment Act (CAPTA) requires States to have policies and procedures in place ...

 

Parental Drug Use as Child Abuse: Summary of State Laws

Series Title:

State Statutes

Author(s):

Child Welfare Information Gateway

Availability:

Download Publication (PDF - 306 KB)

Year Published:

2006 - 28 pages

 

Abuse of drugs or alcohol by parents and other caretakers can have a negative impact on the health, safety, and well-being of children. Approximately 42 States, the District of Columbia, and Guam currently have laws within their child protection statutes that address the issue of substance abuse by parents. Two main areas of concern are (1) the harm caused by prenatal drug exposure and (2) the harm caused to children of any age by exposure to illegal drug activity in the home. The Child Abuse Prevention and Treatment Act (CAPTA) requires states to have policies and procedures in place to ...

 

Substance Abuse

Series Title:

Related Organizations Lists

Author(s):

Child Welfare Information Gateway

Availability:

View Publication

Year Published:

2008 - 0 pages

 

This resource listing provides the addresses and phone numbers of organizations that maintain information about the substance abuse in the context of child welfare. Each entry includes a brief description of the function of the organization.

 

Substance Abuse and Child Maltreatment

Series Title:

Bulletins for Professionals

Author(s):

Child Welfare Information Gateway

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Year Published:

2003 - 5 pages

 

Substance abuse has a major impact on the child welfare system. It is estimated that 9 percent of children in the United States live with at least one parent who abuses alcohol or other drugs. Research has demonstrated that children of substance abusing parents are more likely to experience abuse or neglect than children in non-substance abusing households. This fact sheet addresses the scope of the problem, the impact of parental substance abuse on children, service delivery issues, and agency practice implications. Resources for further information also are provided. 12 references.

 

 

Many times, we foster children with disabilities.  Is *this* what they look at and use for allegations?

 

The Risk and Prevention of Maltreatment of Children with Disabilities

Series Title:

Bulletins for Professionals

Author(s):

Child Welfare Information Gateway

Availability:

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Year Published:

2001 - 8 pages

 

This In Focus report examines the risk of maltreatment for children with disabilities. Topics include prevalence of the problem, characteristics of victims and perpetrators, types of maltreatment, risk factors, and prevention strategies. Emphasis is placed on societal attitudes about disabilities, program policies and procedures, and family-focused programming.

 

How Social Services take kids for $ bonus money $

http://www.fourwinds10.com/siterun_data/health/abuse/news.php?q=1201989441

 

Finding Help When You Need It (from Promoting Healthy Families in Your Community : 2008 Resource Packet)

Author(s):

Child Welfare Information Gateway, Children's Bureau, FRIENDS National Resource Center For Community-Based Child Abuse Prevention

Availability:

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Availability in Spanish:

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Year Published:

2008 - 1 pages

 

When parents are stressed, it can affect their relationship with their children. This tip sheet helps parents identify some common causes of stress and provides suggestions for finding additional support when needed.


Group Response

**Group Nancee found part of the documents that I lost when my computer
crashed a couple of years ago. I remember this article was part of the
evidence of the bonus' monies the agencies get when they move a child,
at least this proves the adoption bonus is not** returned and** *that
they can collect it again in the next adoptive placement. Thank you
Nancee. Way to go. I am putting this someplace** safe and putting in
LEGAL DOCUMENTS on my computer, plus printing it off and putting in the
NFPA's LEGAL MANUAL. marilyn fpls*
**

* *

**PS now we need to go and find the article that was printed by the SUN
as it was printed where Mr. Wexler was quoted. Don't know what year but
we should be able to go into the archives and locate it by using his
name in the search engine.
*
Hi Marilyn, *
* I was clearing out some of my files and found this. Is this some
of the info you were looking for earlier as to proof of how Federal
Funds are used by the different agencies?*
**
*NC*
**
*Executive Director Richard Wexler of the National Coalition for Child
Protection Reform told the /Sun/, "The federal government pays states a
bounty of $4,000 to $8,000 for every finalized adoption over a baseline
number. And if the adoption fails, the state doesn't have to give it
back - in fact, they can place the child again and collect another
bounty, as long as they exceed the baseline. This creates both an
incentive for needless terminations of parental rights, and an incentive
for quick-and-dirty, slipshod placements. Looking at a statewide
average, foster care continues to be widely misused and overused in
Florida. I can tell you that in your region, and especially in Pinellas
County, things almost certainly are worse now."*

 

The Snitch System of “Mandated Reporters”

From: http://www.childwelfare.gov/

Mandatory Reporters of Child Abuse and Neglect

Series Title:

State Statutes

Author(s):

Child Welfare Information Gateway

Availability:

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Year Published:

2008 - 5 pages

 

Specifies individuals, typically by professional groups, who are required to report suspected child maltreatment.

 

Mandatory Reporters of Child Abuse and Neglect: Summary of State Laws

Series Title:

State Statutes

Author(s):

Child Welfare Information Gateway

Availability:

Download Publication (PDF - 633 KB)

Year Published:

2008 - 55 pages

 

Specifies individuals, typically by professional groups, who are required to report suspected child maltreatment. Summaries of laws for all States and US territories are included.

 

The Role of Educators in Preventing and Responding to Child Abuse and Neglect

Author(s):

Office on Child Abuse and Neglect., Caliber Associates.
Crosson-Tower

Availability:

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Year Published:

2003 - 85 pages

 

This manual, designed to examine the roles that teachers, school counselors, school social workers, school nurses, special education professionals, administrators, and other school personnel have in helping maltreated children, provides the basis for the involvement of educators in combating the problem of child abuse and neglect. It also may be used by other professionals involved in child abuse and neglect interventions, such as child protective services, mental health, law enforcement, health care, and early childhood professionals, to gain a better understanding of the role of educators in child protection. Specifically, this manual addresses the following topics: Identifying reasons why educators ...

 

School-Based Child Maltreatment Programs: Synthesis of Lessons Learned

Series Title:

Grantee Lessons Learned

Author(s):

Children's Bureau (DHHS)

Availability:

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Year Published:

2003 - 9 pages

 

The Office on Child Abuse and Neglect awarded several grants during Fiscal Year 1997 to programs that utilized school resources for the prevention and treatment of child abuse and neglect. The three-year demonstration projects focused on collaboration between child protection agencies and school systems; education for parents, teachers, and children about child abuse and neglect; and the involvement of school staff in prevention and intervention. This report summarizes the service approaches and lessons learned by 11 demonstration programs as noted in their final reports. The projects found that training was effective in enhancing knowledge about the signs of child abuse ...

 

 

The Role of Law Enforcement in the Response to Child Abuse and Neglect

Author(s):

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services
Donna Pence, Charles Wilson

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Year Published:

1992 - 78 pages

 

This manual was designed to train State and local law enforcement officials for intervention in and investigation of child abuse and neglect cases. It explains the rules of law enforcement, the nature of team investigations, the investigative process, relationships with other disciplines, interview techniques, and specialized types of investigations. Topics include risk assessment, removal from home, interviewing tools, cross-cultural investigations, foster care, investigation of child deaths, monitoring telephone or personal conversations, polygraph evaluations, and arrest issues. A glossary of terms and a selected bibliography are provided. 1 figure and 54 notes.

The Role of Mental Health Professionals in the Prevention and Treatment of Child Abuse and Neglect

Author(s):

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services
Peterson, Urquiza

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Year Published:

1993 - 82 pages

 

This manual provides mental health professionals with a knowledge base about preventing and treating child abuse and neglect and helps them understand their roles and responsibilities in this area. Sections provide information on mental health disciplines and child abuse intervention; identify the roles of the mental health professional who works with maltreated children and their families, including preventing abuse on a primary and secondary level, providing tertiary intervention services, evaluating and treating children and their families, serving as an advocate and source of information, acting as an educator, helping clients prepare for testifying in court, being a consultant to county ...

 

Immunity for Reporters of Child Abuse and Neglect

Series Title:

State Statutes

Author(s):

Child Welfare Information Gateway

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Year Published:

2005 - 4 pages

 

In order for States to be eligible to receive Federal grants under the Child Abuse Prevention and Treatment Act (CAPTA), they are required to establish provisions for immunity from liability for individuals making good faith reports of suspected or known instances of child abuse or neglect. The term "good faith" refers to the assumption that the reporter, to the best of his or her knowledge, had reason to believe that the child in question was being subjected to abuse or neglect. Even if the allegations made in the report cannot be fully substantiated, the reporter is still provided with immunity.

Immunity for Reporters of Child Abuse and Neglect: Summary of State Laws

Series Title:

State Statutes

Author(s):

Child Welfare Information Gateway

Availability:

Download Publication (PDF - 261 KB)

Year Published:

2005 - 21 pages

 

In order for States to be eligible to receive Federal grants under the Child Abuse Prevention and Treatment Act (CAPTA), they are required to establish provisions for immunity from liability for individuals making good faith reports of suspected or known instances of child abuse or neglect. The term "good faith" refers to the assumption that the reporter, to the best of his or her knowledge, had reason to believe that the child in question was being subjected to abuse or neglect. Even if the allegations made in the report cannot be fully substantiated, the reporter is still provided with immunity. ...

 

Penalties for Failure to Report and False Reporting of Child Abuse and Neglect

Series Title:

State Statutes

Author(s):

Child Welfare Information Gateway

Availability:

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Year Published:

2007 - 3 pages

 

Penalties that States may impose on mandatory reporters who fail to report, or on any person who makes a false report.

Penalties for Failure to Report and False Reporting of Child Abuse and Neglect: Summary of State Laws

Series Title:

State Statutes

Author(s):

Child Welfare Information Gateway

Availability:

Download Publication (PDF - 200 KB)

Year Published:

2007 - 23 pages

 

Penalties that States may impose on mandatory reporters who fail to report, or on any person who makes a false report. Summaries of laws for all States and US territories are included.

 

 

The following is from http://www.massoutrage.com

Dirty Trick No. Nine
The DSS has a network of "mandated reporters" everywhere your child is, to snitch on you. All helping professionals are required to report you to DSS if they suspect abuse; The people you think will help you will now betray you.

Everyone is a Snitch-
Who Can You Talk To?

One of the scariest DSS dirty tricks is a vast Soviet Style snitch network which they have set up all over the state, with the force of law, to report you to the authorities. This network is made up of ALL teachers, doctors, nurses, counselors, therapists, police officers, dentists, chiropractors, day care workers, school counselors, etc. These people must report any suspected "abuse", or be prosecuted and fined. They cannot be prosecuted for making a false report, unless it is frivolous. See Mass. Gen Laws Chapter 119, Section 51A.

All these people, called "mandated reporters", have been endlessly taught the importance of reporting. All their professional seminars, their whole culture, demands that they report, just in case. When in doubt, they report. Then, if there really is abuse, they won't get in trouble. Thus, the DSS has a seamless web of snoops and spies just about everywhere a child is likely to be.

Even Your Child is a Snitch

Even worse, you are no longer safe from the DSS police in your own home. They have also found a way to turn your own child against you. At the government (public) school, children are given the DSS phone number, and are taught to report things they see in the home to the authorities, like corporal punishment, drug use, and even family arguments They break down children's respect for their parents, and foster a submission to the state.

What they don't tell a child is that if he reports his parents to DSS, he may destroy his whole family forever. The child may be mad about getting disciplined, so he'll get even by siccing DSS on them. Then, they take that child, and all the other ones, too, just in case. DSS didn't tell the child that it would happen that way, but now it's too late, just like Judas.

You Thought You Were Getting Help

When you go to a counselor to get help, when you take Johnny to the emergency room if he falls off his bike, or when you talk to his school counselor, watch out. You are now a suspect. The person to whom you turned for help is likely your enemy, and may turn you in. You may go for help, and end up losing your kids. You need to think differently about how to get help. Of course, never ask the DSS for help. Many people do, and lose their kids.

Where Can You Go?

Who can you go to? Only two types of professionals cannot be made to divulge what you tell them, clergy and lawyers. Both are a little shaky, either due to fear of DSS, or because they agree with the doctrine of state control of families.

Clergy have a privilege not to report, or to testify about what you say to them. Lawyers have an even more ironclad privilege, called "attorney-client privilege". Many lawyers, however, wanting to curry favor with DSS, will actually betray their client's confidences. So, find a clergyman or a lawyer who hates DSS, and tell him your problems. That clergyman or lawyer may be able to help you find a medical professional who hates DSS enough to not report if your child has been hurt.

Solve Half of Your Snitch Problem
With This One Action

The other thing you MUST do is get your children out of the government (public) school. It is the major pipeline from DSS to your child. DSS takes children right out of school when they can coerce them into making "disclosures", and they don't come home that day. Sometimes DSS doesn't even tell the parents, and when mom comes to pick up the child at the bus stop, there is no child, and no one knows why. Needless to say, the parents are frantic, until they finally figure out what happened.

If you send your kids to a government school, you are sending them to your enemy to be educated. They will be taught to hate you and your values, and to sell you out. Get them out, before it's too late. This is the principle of "staying under the radar", which we review in detail in the "Fight Back" section.

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Recognizing Child Abuse and Neglect: Signs and Symptoms

Series Title:

Factsheets

Author(s):

Child Welfare Information Gateway

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Year Published:

2006 - 4 pages

 

The first step in helping abused or neglected children is learning to recognize the signs of child abuse and neglect. This fact sheet lists general signs that may signal the presence of child abuse. It also includes signs associated with specific types of abuse such as physical abuse, neglect, sexual abuse, and emotional maltreatment.

 

A.                Snitch System

1.           The system as the thought police

2.           Social workers outrageously make hotline calls of child abuse

for each other

3.           Compelling by law to snitch – this is not right!

4.           Those who are compelled by law to snitch = “mandated reporters”

 

B.              Secret Police

1.           Investigation process

a.         Group experiences & advice

2.           Interrogations (questioning)

a.         Group experiences & advice

3.           The truth about “serve & protect” and “public servants (government workers)”

a.         Group experiences & advice

4.           Self-appointed demi-Gods that cannot be wrong & why

 

C.              Guilty as charged!  Even though “proven” innocent = for all parents of any kind

1.           To make a case, the system tramples on our rights.  Nothing in lying, falsification of records, fabrications, ripping children from loving arms is beyond the system in the lack of values.

a.         Group experiences & advice

2.           The child abuse accusation is put forth first and the children removed.  Then, the case is made against the parents:  After-the-fact.

a.         What else can they do when it is a false accusation?

·           Group experiences & advice

3.           You are placed on the Central Registry no matter what.  Please see: http://rScrapZ.com

 

D.              Look out for “support” entities

1.           Your area Foster Parents Association

2.           Peace Centers for visitations

3.           Sexually-abused Kids “Summer Counseling Camps”

4.           Group experiences & advice

 

 

 

Amazon.com: Social Service Gestapo: How the Government Can Legally Abduct Your Child (Salt Series): Books: Janson Kauser READ THIS REVIEW SHE WAS A JUDGE !! YIKES 

 

From:  Child Welfare Information Gateway  http://www.childwelfare.gov

 

Mandatory Reporters of Child Abuse and Neglect
State Statutes Series

Author(s):  Child Welfare Information Gateway

Year Published:  2008

Current Through January 2008

You may wish to review this introductory text to better understand the information contained in your State's statute. To see how your State addresses this issue, visit the State Statutes Search.

 

All States, the District of Columbia, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, and the U.S. territories of American Samoa, Guam, the Northern Mariana Islands, and the Virgin Islands have statutes identifying persons who are required to report child maltreatment under specific circumstances.

Professionals Required to Report

 

Approximately 48 States, the District of Columbia, American Samoa, Guam, the Northern Mariana Islands, Puerto Rico, and the U.S. Virgin Islands designate professions whose members are mandated by law to report child maltreatment.1 Individuals designated as mandatory reporters typically have frequent contact with children. Such individuals may include:

*       Social workers

*       Teachers and other school personnel

*       Physicians and other health-care workers

*       Mental health professionals

*       Childcare providers

*       Medical examiners or coroners

*       Law enforcement officers

 

Some other professions frequently mandated across the States include commercial film or photograph processors (in 11 States, Guam, and Puerto Rico), substance abuse counselors (in 13 States), and probation or parole officers (in 15 States).2 Six States (Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, Connecticut, Illinois, and South Dakota) include domestic violence workers on the list of mandated reporters. Court-appointed special advocates are mandatory reporters in seven States (Arkansas, California, Maine, Montana, Oregon, Virginia, and Wisconsin). Members of the clergy now are required to report in 26 States.3

Reporting by Other Persons

 

In approximately 18 States and Puerto Rico, any person who suspects child abuse or neglect is required to report. Of these 18 States, 16 States and Puerto Rico specify certain professionals who must report but also require all persons to report suspected abuse or neglect, regardless of profession.4 New Jersey and Wyoming require all persons to report without specifying any professions. In all other States, territories, and the District of Columbia, any person is permitted to report. These voluntary reporters of abuse are often referred to as "permissive reporters."

 

Standards for Making a Report

The circumstances under which a mandatory reporter must make a report vary from State to State. Typically, a report must be made when the reporter, in his or her official capacity, suspects or has reasons to believe that a child has been abused or neglected. Another standard frequently used is when the reporter has knowledge of, or observes a child being subjected to, conditions that would reasonably result in harm to the child. Permissive reporters follow the same standards when electing to make a report.

Privileged Communications

 

Mandatory reporting statutes also may specify when a communication is privileged. "Privileged communications" is the statutory recognition of the right to maintain confidential communications between professionals and their clients, patients, or congregants. To enable States to provide protection to maltreated children, the reporting laws in most States and territories restrict this privilege for mandated reporters. All but four States and Puerto Rico currently address the issue of privileged communications within their reporting laws, either affirming the privilege or denying it (i.e., not allowing privilege to be grounds for failing to report).5 For instance:

*       The physician-patient and husband-wife privileges are the most common to be denied by States.

*       The attorney-client privilege is most commonly affirmed.

*       The clergy-penitent privilege is also widely affirmed, although that privilege is usually limited to confessional communications and, in some States, is denied altogether.6

 

Inclusion of the Reporter's Name in the Report

Most States maintain toll-free telephone numbers for receiving reports of abuse or neglect.7 Reports may be made anonymously to most of these reporting numbers, but States find it helpful to their investigations to know the identity of reporters. Approximately 16 States, the District of Columbia, American Samoa, Guam, and the Virgin Islands currently require mandatory reporters to provide their names and contact information, either at the time of the initial oral report or as part of a written report.8 The laws in Connecticut, Delaware, and Washington allow child protection workers to request the name of the reporter. In Wyoming, the reporter does not have to provide his or her identity as part of the written report, but if the person takes and submits photographs or x-rays of the child, his or her name must be provided.

Disclosure of the Reporter's Identity

 

All jurisdictions have provisions in statute to maintain the confidentiality of abuse and neglect records. The identity of the reporter is specifically protected from disclosure to the alleged perpetrator in 39 States, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, American Samoa, Guam, and the Northern Mariana Islands.9 This protection is maintained even when other information from the report may be disclosed.

 

Release of the reporter's identity is allowed in some jurisdictions under specific circumstances or to specific departments or officials. For example, disclosure of the reporter's identity can be ordered by the court when there is a compelling reason to disclose (in California, Mississippi, Oklahoma, Tennessee, Texas, and Guam) or upon a finding that the reporter knowingly made a false report (in Alabama, Arkansas, Connecticut, Kentucky, Louisiana, Minnesota, South Dakota, and Vermont). In some jurisdictions (California, Florida, Minnesota, Tennessee, Vermont, the District of Columbia, and Guam), the reporter can waive confidentiality and give consent to the release of his or her name.

To see how your State addresses this issue, visit the State Statutes Search.

 

To find information on all of the States and territories, view the complete printable PDF, Mandatory Reporters of Child Abuse and Neglect: Summary of State Laws (PDF - 633 KB).

 

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

 

1The word approximately is used to stress the fact that the States frequently amend their laws. This information is current only through January 2008. At that time, New Jersey and Wyoming were the only two States that did not enumerate specific professional groups as mandated reporters but required all persons to report. back
 

2Film processors are mandated reporters in Alaska, California, Colorado, Georgia, Illinois, Iowa, Louisiana, Maine, Missouri, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Guam, and Puerto Rico. Substance abuse counselors are required to report in Alaska, Connecticut, Illinois, Iowa, Kansas, Massachusetts, Nevada, New York, North Dakota, Oregon, South Carolina, South Dakota, and Wisconsin. Probation or parole officers are mandated reporters in Arkansas, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Hawaii, Illinois, Massachusetts, Missouri, Nevada, North Dakota, South Dakota, Texas, Vermont, Virginia, and Washington. back
 

3Alabama, Arizona, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Illinois, Louisiana, Maine, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Mexico, North Dakota, Ohio, Oregon, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Vermont, West Virginia, and Wisconsin. For more information, see Child Welfare Information Gateway's Clergy as Mandatory Reporters of Child Abuse and Neglect. back
 

4Delaware, Florida, Idaho, Indiana, Kentucky, Maryland, Mississippi, Nebraska, New Hampshire, New Mexico, North Carolina, Oklahoma, Rhode Island, Tennessee, Texas, and Utah. back
 

5Connecticut, Mississippi, New Jersey, and New York do not currently address the issue of privileged communications within their reporting laws. The issue of privilege may be addressed elsewhere in the statutes of these States, such as rules of evidence. back
 

6New Hampshire, North Carolina, Oklahoma, Rhode Island, Texas, and West Virginia disallow the use of the clergy-penitent privilege as grounds for failing to report suspected child abuse or neglect. For a more complete discussion of the requirement for clergy to report child abuse and neglect, see the Information Gateway publication Clergy as Mandatory Reporters of Child Abuse and Neglect. back
 

7For State-specific information about these hotlines, see Information Gateway's Child Abuse Reporting Numbers. back
 

8California, Colorado, Florida, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Louisiana, Maine, Massachusetts, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, New York, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, and Vermont have this requirement. back
 

9The statutes in Alaska, Arizona, Delaware, Idaho, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, Virginia, West Virginia, Wyoming, and the Virgin Islands do not specifically protect reporter identity but do provide for confidentiality of records in general. back

This publication is a product of the State Statutes Series prepared by Child Welfare Information Gateway. While every attempt has been made to be as complete as possible, additional information on these topics may be in other sections of a State's code as well as agency regulations, case law, and informal practices and procedures.

 

 

The Following Are CPS User Manuals.  For each manual, you can click on “view publication” to see the contents and get the information.  As an example, “view publication” was already clicked for the first one on “The Role of Educators…”  The table of contents comes up with very useful information provided.  Knowledge is power.  In this case, if we know what is being looked for and how it is set up, protective action can be taken for our children and ourselves.

 

From: http://www.childwelfare.gov/

 

The Role of Educators in Preventing and Responding to Child Abuse and Neglect
User Manual Series (2003)

Author(s):  Office on Child Abuse and Neglect., Caliber Associates.
Crosson-Tower

Year Published:  2003

This manual, designed to examine the roles that teachers, school counselors, school social workers, school nurses, special education professionals, administrators, and other school personnel have in helping maltreated children, provides the basis for the involvement of educators in combating the problem of child abuse and neglect. It also may be used by other professionals involved in child abuse and neglect interventions, such as child protective services, mental health, law enforcement, health care, and early childhood professionals, to gain a better understanding of the role of educators in child protection. Specifically, this manual addresses the following topics: Identifying reasons why educators ...

Table of Contents

Preface

Acknowledgments

1 - Purpose and Overview

2 - Identifying Reasons Why Educators Are Concerned About Child Abuse and Neglect

3 - Recognizing Child Abuse and Neglect

4 - Reporting Child Abuse and Neglect

5 - Providing Support After the Report: What Schools Can Offer

6 - Preventing Child Abuse and Neglect

Endnotes

Appendix A - Glossary of Terms

Appendix B - Resource Listings of Selected National Organizations Concerned with Child Maltreatment

Appendix C - Child Abuse Reporting Numbers

Appendix D - Educators' Checklist for Recognizing Possible Child Maltreatment

Appendix E - Sample List of Contacts for Reporting Suspected Cases of Child Abuse or Neglect

Appendix F - Sample Report of Suspected Child Abuse and Neglect

 

The Role of Mental Health Professionals in the Prevention and Treatment of Child Abuse and Neglect
User Manual Series (1993)

Author(s):  U.S. Department of Health and Human Services
Peterson, Urquiza

Year Published:  1993

Appendix B : Other User Manuals In This Series

A Coordinated Response to Child Abuse and Neglect: A Basic Manual

Child Protective Services: A Guide for Caseworkers

Caregivers of Young Children: Preventing and Responding to Child Maltreatment

The Role of Educators in the Prevention and Treatment of Child Abuse and Neglect

The Role of Law Enforcement in the Response to Child Abuse and Neglect

Working With the Courts in Child Protection

Protecting Children in Military Families: A Cooperative Response

 

Child Abuse and Neglect User Manual Series 1990s

The following are the Child Abuse and Neglect User Manuals from the 1990s. Please note that some of this information may be outdated and that updated versions of some manuals are included in the new and revised Child Abuse and Neglect User Manuals.

 

Caregivers of Young Children: Preventing and Responding to Child Maltreatment

Series Title:

User Manual Series (1992)

Author(s):

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services
Koralek

Availability:

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Printable Version

Year Published:

1992 - 85 pages

This manual examines the roles and responsibilities of caregivers of young children in preventing and reporting child maltreatment. The manual provides an overview of child abuse and explains how to recognize and report cases of suspected abuse. Guidelines for caring for maltreated children and supporting their families are also provided. Specific topics include mandatory reporting, staff selection procedures, staff supervision and policies, developmental issues, and developing positive relationships with parents. 6 figures and 36 references.

 

Child Neglect: A Guide for Intervention

Series Title:

User Manual Series (1993)

Author(s):

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services
Gaudin

Availability:

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Printable Version (PDF - 240 KB)

Year Published:

1993 - 92 pages

This report presents a broad overview of issues related to child neglect in the United States. The report examines aspects of child neglect that can help people better understand its causes and effects, and provides information that can be used to develop effective prevention and intervention strategies. The report is divided into 7 main chapters that discuss the different definitions, causes, and effects of neglect; the incidence and prevalence of neglect; assessment, intervention, and prevention strategies and techniques that can be used by Child Protective Services and other agencies to treat and prevent neglect; and the implications for public policy ...

 

Child Sexual Abuse: Intervention and Treatment Issues

Series Title:

User Manual Series (1993)

Author(s):

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services
Faller

Availability:

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Printable Version (PDF - 283 KB)

Year Published:

1993 - 126 pages

The manual addresses the needs of professionals regarding child sexual abuse, describes professional practices, and discusses how to assist sexually abused children and their families. Treatment techniques for the victim, the nonoffending parent or mother, and the offending father are offered, and research on reliability and suggestibility of child witnesses is reviewed briefly. The focus of the manual is on case management and substantiation and is designed to assist child protection workers, child abuse investigation and mental health staff, legal professionals, and education and health care professionals. Child interviewing techniques and sample questions are included. The document contains a glossary ...

 

Crisis Intervention in Child Abuse and Neglect

Series Title:

User Manual Series (1994)

Author(s):

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services
Gentry

Availability:

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Printable Version (PDF - 193 KB)
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Year Published:

1994 - 80 pages

This manual, part of the National Center on Child Abuse and Neglect's User Manual Series, helps caseworkers improve their assistance to children and families in crisis. Sections present a brief overview of crisis; define crisis, identify the elements and phases of crises, highlight client feelings during a crisis, and discuss the psychological effects of crises; and outline the goals of crisis intervention and describe a nine-step crisis intervention model. The manual offers suggestions for involving the entire family in the crisis intervention assessment process; examines specific treatment approaches and techniques, including community systems, multimodal, cognitive behavioral, task-centered, family, and eclectic ...

Protecting Children in Substance-Abusing Families

Series Title:

User Manual Series (1994)

Author(s):

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services
Kropenske, Howard, Breitenbach, Dembo, et al.

Availability:

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Printable Version (PDF - 1590 KB)
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Year Published:

1994 - 142 pages

This manual, developed by NCCAN, provides an overview of how to identify parental substance abuse, assess the strengths and needs of families, develop service plans, and implement strategies for helping children of substance-abusing parents. Physical and behavioral indications of substance abuse, characteristics of parents at risk of substance abuse, and special risks of children of chemically involved parents are reviewed. The manual also addresses reporting obligations, comprehensive family assessment, and juvenile court involvement. Innovative approaches to intervention are described, such as programs for pregnant and parenting women, residential treatment, family preservation, transitional group care, specialized foster homes, support programs for ...

 

The Role of Law Enforcement in the Response to Child Abuse and Neglect

Series Title:

User Manual Series (1992)

Author(s):

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services
Donna Pence, Charles Wilson

Availability:

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Printable Version (PDF - 212 KB)
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Year Published:

1992 - 78 pages

This manual was designed to train State and local law enforcement officials for intervention in and investigation of child abuse and neglect cases. It explains the rules of law enforcement, the nature of team investigations, the investigative process, relationships with other disciplines, interview techniques, and specialized types of investigations. Topics include risk assessment, removal from home, interviewing tools, cross-cultural investigations, foster care, investigation of child deaths, monitoring telephone or personal conversations, polygraph evaluations, and arrest issues. A glossary of terms and a selected bibliography are provided. 1 figure and 54 notes.

 

The Role of Mental Health Professionals in the Prevention and Treatment of Child Abuse and Neglect

Series Title:

User Manual Series (1993)

Author(s):

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services
Peterson, Urquiza

Availability:

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Printable Version (PDF - 191 KB)
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Year Published:

1993 - 82 pages

This manual provides mental health professionals with a knowledge base about preventing and treating child abuse and neglect and helps them understand their roles and responsibilities in this area. Sections provide information on mental health disciplines and child abuse intervention; identify the roles of the mental health professional who works with maltreated children and their families, including preventing abuse on a primary and secondary level, providing tertiary intervention services, evaluating and treating children and their families, serving as an advocate and source of information, acting as an educator, helping clients prepare for testifying in court, being a consultant to county ...

 

Substitute Care Providers: Helping Abused and Neglected Children

Series Title:

User Manual Series (1994)

Author(s):

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services
Watson

Availability:

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Printable Version (PDF - 251 KB)

Year Published:

1994 - 82 pages

This manual for child welfare personnel provides them with information on serving abused and neglected children who are in family foster care or who are adopted. Section 1 presents background information on substitute care and permanency planning. Section 2 identifies the basic needs of all children and the special needs of both children in substitute care and maltreated children. Section 3 describes the systems, networks, and teams with which people who help maltreated children interact, including the service network and the substitute care team. Section 4 offers guidelines for meeting the needs of maltreated children, focusing on understanding the assessment ...

 

Treatment for Abused and Neglected Children: Infancy to Age 18

Series Title:

User Manual Series (1994)

Author(s):

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services
Urquiza, Winn

Availability:

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Printable Version (PDF - 480 KB)
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Year Published:

1994 - 134 pages

This manual, produced by NCCAN as part of the User Manual Series, provides an overview of the treatment of sexually abused, physically abused, and neglected children. Child development is briefly reviewed and the study of developmental psychopathology is described. All aspects of child development are considered, including intrapersonal development, interpersonal development, physical development, sexual development, and behavioral conduct development. Consequences of abuse and neglect, assessment of maltreatment, the therapeutic process and the role of the therapist, treatment issues and specialized interventions, and case management are addressed. The manual provides a glossary of terms and list of resources for more detailed ...

 

Working With the Courts in Child Protection

Series Title:

User Manual Series (1992)

Author(s):

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services
Feller, Davidson, Hardin, Horowitz

Availability:

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Printable Version (PDF - 224 KB)

Year Published:

1992 - 78 pages

This manual provides an overview of court procedures in child protection cases. It describes court processes, defines legal requirements for evidence, and provides guidelines to help professionals participate in the process. Child protective court, criminal court, and domestic relations court processes are summarized. Specific topics include rules of evidence, use of records as evidence, privileged communications, courtroom dress, testimony, expert witnesses, competency of child witnesses, and preparing the child to testify. 1 figure and 88 references.

 

New Releases in the OCAN User Manual Series

The Office on Child Abuse and Neglect (OCAN) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services has recently released two more publications in its popular User Manual series. The first, Supervising Child Protective Services Caseworkers, provides the foundation for effective supervisory practice in child protective services (CPS). It describes the roles and responsibilities of the CPS supervisor, and it offers practice-oriented advice on how to carry out supervisory responsibilities effectively. Best practices and critical issues in supervisory practice are underscored throughout. Topics include the nature of CPS supervision, building staff capacity, supervisory feedback, clinical supervision, and recruitment and retention. While the manual is designed primarily for CPS supervisors and administrators, it also is relevant to other child welfare supervisors.

 

The second new User Manual, Child Protection in Families Experiencing Domestic Violence, looks at the problem of domestic violence in families. While system responses are primarily targeted towards adult victims of abuse, increasing attention is focused on the children who witness domestic violence. Studies estimate that 10 to 20 percent of children are at risk for exposure to domestic violence. Research also indicates that children exposed to domestic violence are at an increased risk of being abused or neglected. This manual provides background on this complex topic and addresses many practice issues, including the overlap between child maltreatment and domestic violence, modifying child protection practice with families experiencing domestic violence, enhancing caseworker safety and support in child protection cases involving domestic violence, and building collaborative responses for families experiencing domestic violence.

 

Another recent title in the User Manual series is The Role of Educators in Preventing and Responding to Child Abuse and Neglect. This manual examines the roles that teachers, school counselors, school social workers, school nurses, special education professionals, administrators, and other school personnel have in helping maltreated children.

 

These publications, as well as other titles in the User Manual series, are available through the website of the National Clearinghouse on Child Abuse and Neglect Information at http://nccanch.acf.hhs.gov/profess/tools/usermanual.cfm.

 

A Coordinated Response to Child Abuse and Neglect: The Foundation for Practice

Author(s):

Office on Child Abuse and Neglect (HHS)
Goldman, Salus, Wolcott, Kennedy

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Year Published:

2003 - 114 pages

 

Written for new child protective services (CPS) caseworkers, professionals working with children and families, other professionals and concerned community members, this manual addresses the definition, scope, causes, and consequences of child abuse and neglect. It presents an overview of prevention efforts and the child protection process from identification and reporting through investigation and assessment to service provision and case closure. This manual is intended to accompany each profession-specific manual in the User Manual Series. Appendices include a glossary of terms, resource listings of selected national organizations concerned with child maltreatment, and State toll-free child abuse reporting numbers. 150 references.

 

Cross-Reporting Among Responders to Child Abuse and Neglect

Series Title:

State Statutes

Author(s):

Child Welfare Information Gateway

Availability:

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Download Publication (PDF - 163 KB)

Year Published:

2005 - 1 pages

 

The Child Abuse Prevention and Treatment Act, as amended (42 U.S.C. 5106a), requires States to make provision for the cooperation of State law enforcement officials and State agencies providing human services in the investigation, assessment, prosecution, and treatment of child abuse or neglect.

 

Cross-Reporting Among Responders to Child Abuse and Neglect: Full-Text Excerpts of State Laws

Series Title:

State Statutes

Author(s):

Child Welfare Information Gateway

Availability:

Download Publication (PDF - 295 KB)

Year Published:

2005 - 23 pages

 

The Child Abuse Prevention and Treatment Act, as amended (42 U.S.C. 5106a), requires States to make provision for the cooperation of State law enforcement officials and State agencies providing human services in the investigation, assessment, prosecution, and treatment of child abuse or neglect. Procedures that must be followed in handling reports of suspected child abuse or neglect are identified for all 50 states, the District of Columbia, American Samoa, Guam, Northern Mariana Islands, Puerto Rico, and the Virgin Islands.

 

Definitions of Child Abuse and Neglect

Series Title:

State Statutes

Author(s):

Child Welfare Information Gateway

Availability:

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Download Publication (PDF - 138 KB)

Year Published:

2007 - 6 pages

 

Defines the conduct, acts, and omissions that constitute reportable child abuse or neglect.

 

Definitions of Child Abuse and Neglect: Summary of State Laws

Series Title:

State Statutes

Author(s):

Child Welfare Information Gateway

Availability:

Download Publication (PDF - 442 KB)

Year Published:

2007 - 89 pages

 

Defines the conduct, acts, and omissions that constitute reportable child abuse or neglect. Summaries of laws for all States and US territories are included.

 

Determining the Best Interests of the Child

Series Title:

State Statutes

Author(s):

Child Welfare Information Gateway

Availability:

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Download Publication (PDF - 168 KB)

Year Published:

2005 - 2 pages

 

Whenever a court must make a determination as to the custody and/or placement of a child, or must decide on a petition for termination of parental rights, the court must weigh whether that decision will be in the best interests of the child. All States and Territories require that the child's best interests be considered whevever such decisions regarding a child's placement are made. This resource provides the factors that may be considered by the court when making a best interests detemination.

 

Determining the Best Interests of the Child: Summary of State Laws

Series Title:

State Statutes

Author(s):

Child Welfare Information Gateway

Availability:

Download Publication (PDF - 303 KB)

Year Published:

2005 - 29 pages

 

Whenever a court must make a determination as to the custody and/or placement of a child, or must decide on a petition for termination of parental rights, the court must weigh whether that decision will be in the best interests of the child. All States and Territories require that the child's best interests be considered whenever such decisions regarding a child's placement are made. This resource contains the text of the "best interests of the child" statutes for all states, the Distsrict of Columbia, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, and the U.S. territories of American Samoa, Guam, the Northern Mariana ...

 

Executive Summary of Effective Intervention in Domestic Violence and Child Maltreatment Cases: Guidelines for Policy and Practice. Recommendations From the National Council of Juvenile and Family Court Judges Family Violence Department.

Author(s):

Schechter, Edleson

Availability:

Download Publication (PDF - 66 KB)

Year Published:

1999 - 6 pages

 

This report summarizes the recommendations of the National Council of Juvenile and Family Court Judges for responding to domestic violence and child abuse within the same family, available in full at http://www.childwelfare.gov/pubs/otherpubs/ncjfcj.pdf . An advisory committee of the Council focused on coordinating interventions provided by the child protection system, domestic violence programs, and juvenile or trial courts, as well as law enforcement, child welfare, churches, schools, health care systems, and extended families. Emphasis was placed onthe need to ensure the safety, well-being, and stability of children and their families. The foundation principles also recommend the expansion and reallocation ...

 

Crisis Intervention in Child Abuse and Neglect

Author(s):

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services
Gentry

Availability:

View Publication
Download Publication (PDF - 193 KB)
Order Publication (Free - Add to Cart)

Year Published:

1994 - 80 pages

 

This manual, part of the National Center on Child Abuse and Neglect's User Manual Series, helps caseworkers improve their assistance to children and families in crisis. Sections present a brief overview of crisis; define crisis, identify the elements and phases of crises, highlight client feelings during a crisis, and discuss the psychological effects of crises; and outline the goals of crisis intervention and describe a nine-step crisis intervention model. The manual offers suggestions for involving the entire family in the crisis intervention assessment process; examines specific treatment approaches and techniques, including community systems, multimodal, cognitive behavioral, task-centered, family, and eclectic

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