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Components of a Caseworker's File

It may be  more feasible to obtain CPS records if specific information is requested in written form. 

From Child Welfare Information Gateway http://www.childwelfare.gov/

Caseworker Guide Chapter 7:  Family Assessment  (see eGuidebook CPS Guide for Caseworkers for entire Guide)

 

Family Assessment Guide

Reasons for Referral. Briefly summarize the primary reasons this family is receiving continuing child welfare services and define the terms of any safety plan that was developed with the family.

Sources of Information. Identify all sources of information used to frame this assessment and refer to the specific dates of contact with the family and other persons or systems that relate to assessment information.

Identifying Information. Describe the family system, as defined by the family. Include members' names, ages, and relationship to the primary caregiver; sources of economic support and whether it is perceived as adequate; and current school or vocational training status. Describe the current household situation, including sleeping arrangements, and the client's perception of their neighborhood, especially as it pertains to safety.

Presenting Problems, Needs, and Strengths. Describe family members' perceptions of the presenting needs as they relate to each individual member, the family system, and its environment. As appropriate, include a history of the problem development and previous attempts to address it, as well as an explanation of family members' readiness and motivation to engage in help for the problem at this particular time. Also, identify the family's stated goals as they relate to each problem.

Family Background and History. Write a social history. Ideally, the primary caregiver(s) should be described first. Begin with his or her birth, and describe the family of origin—its members, their relationships with each other, and significant descriptive characteristics of each member. Follow that member's development into adulthood and up to but not including the present time. Genograms are particularly helpful in understanding life events over time. Identify important personal relationships, including those characterized by maltreatment, substance abuse, or violence; identify positive life events as well as stressful ones; and describe relationships with systems, including educational, vocational, legal, religious, medical, mental health, and employment. The history of other adults and children in the household should be summarized, addressing the preceding points, as appropriate and available. Complete this history in chronological order, if possible.

Present Status. Describe the present life situation of the family, particularly information about risks and strengths related to each child in the family, each caregiver's functioning, the family system, and the environment and community. Standardized assessment measures may be helpful to better understand the family and identify areas to be recorded in the casefile.

Tentative Assessment. Summarize risks and strengths related to each family member. This is the opportunity for the worker to analyze the collected information and to draw conclusions about the most important strengths and needs of individual family members and the family as a system. Knowledge of human development, personality theory and psychopathology, family systems, ecological theory, and psychosocial theory should be drawn on to form these conclusions. The worker should make informed judgments about the objective and observational information that has been collected and recorded. In this section, the caseworker specifically summarizes what must change to reduce the risk of child maltreatment.

 

 


 

Parenting
evaluation instruments directory

  http://www.agnr.umd.edu/nnfr/eval/eval_pi.html

Attitudes to Having Children (1980)

Behavioral Coding System (1981)

Child Behavior Checklist (1983)

Child's Report on Parental Behavior Inventory (CRPBI) (1965)

Child-Rearing Sex Role Attitude Scale (1981)

Childhood Level of Well-Being Scale (1988)

Children's Perception Questionnaire (1982)

Cleminshaw-Guidubaldi Parent Satisfaction Scale (1985)

Cornell Parent Behavior Inventory (1970)

Cornell Socialization Inventory (1974)

Custody Quotient, Research Edition (1988)

Daily Home Report (n.d.)

Daily Rating of Effective Parenting (1974)

Difficulty Index for First-Time Parents (1965)

Dyadic Parent-Child Interaction Coding System (1981)

EMBU: An Inventory Assessing Memories of Parental Rearing Behavior (1984)

Emotional Impact of Parental Attitudes (1980)

Environmental Assessment Index (1987)

Family Adjustment Test (1951)

Family Benefits Inventory (1986)

Family Constraining and Enabling Coding System (1984)

Family Decision-making Style Scale (1984)

Family Interaction Q-Sort (1988)

High Scope Knowledge Scale (1980)

Home Quality Rating Scale (1977)

Hopkins Surveys of School and Family Connections (1982)

Ideas about Parenting (1985)

Index of Parental Socialization Styles (1980)

Indexes of the Parent-Child Relationship (1986)

Infant Caregiving Inventory (1983)

Interaction Behavior Code

Interaction Rating Scale (1986)

Intra-Family Attitude Scales (1952)

Issues Checklist

Kansas Parental Satisfaction Scale (1985)

Knowledge of Infant Development Inventory (1981)

Little Parental Valuing Styles System (1986)

Marjoribanks Family Learning Environment Scale (1987)

Maryland Parent Attitude Survey (1966)

Maternal Developmental Expectations and Childrearing (1980)

Maternal Expectations, Attitudes, Beliefs Inventory (1984)

Maternal Social Support Index (1981)

Michigan Screening Profile of Parenting (1978)

Mother-Child Relationship Evaluation (1908)

NC-158 Q-Sort Inventory of Parental Behaviors (1983)

Neo-Natal Perception Inventories (1979)

Parent Affect Test (1983)

Parent Awareness Skills Survey (1990)

Parent Behavior Progression, Revised (1983)

Parent Perception Inventory (1983)

Parent Satisfaction with Child Care Scale (1975)

Parent-Child Areas of Change Questionnaire (1985)

Parent-Child Interaction Rating Scales (1964)

Parent-Child Relations Questionnaire (1963)

Parent-Child Relationship Survey (1988)

Parental Acceptance Coding Scheme (1986)

Parental Acceptance-Rejection Behavior Observation Procedures (1984)

Parental Acceptance-Rejection Interview Schedule (1984)

Parental Accpetance-Rejection Questionnaire (1978)

Parental Attitude Research Instrument (PARI) (1958)

Parental Attitude Survey Scales (1963)

Parental Attitudes Toward Childrearing (1981)

Parental Bonding Instrument (1979)

Parental Reaction to Dating Relationship Scale (1986)

Parenting Stress Index (1983)

Perceived Parenting Questionnaire (n.d.)

Perceptions of Parental Role Scales (1985)

Perinatal Anxieties and Attitudes Scale (1980)

Positive Attitudes Toward Living at Home (1988)

Psycholinguistic Classification System for Analyzing Mother-Child Interactions (1985)

Response-Class Matrix

Rules in the Home Checklist (1983)

Screening for Problem Parenting (1986)

Sentence Completion Series (1992)

Survey of School Climate for Pregnant and Parenting Teens (1987)

Therapy Attitude Inventory (1974)

 


 

Hierarchy

 

State Health Department

National Center for Injury Prevention and Control

Center for Disease Control (CDC)

Dept. of Health & Human Services (DHHS)

http://www.cdc.gov/ncipc/pub-res/measure.htm

 

Measuring Violence-Related Attitudes, Behaviors, and Influences Among Youths:

A Compendium of Assessment Tools - Second Editionpicture of the book Measuring Violence-Related Attitudes, Beliefs, and Behaviors Among Youths

This compendium provides researchers and prevention specialists with a set of tools to assess violence-related beliefs, behaviors, and influences, as well as to evaluate programs to prevent youth violence. If you are new to the field of youth violence prevention and unfamiliar with available measures, you may find this compendium to be particularly useful.  If you are an experienced researcher, this compendium may serve as a resource to identify additional measures to assess the factors associated with violence among youths.

Although this compendium contains more than 170 measures, it is not an exhaustive listing of available measures. A few of the more widely used measures to assess aggression in children, for example, are copyrighted and could not be included here. Other measures being used in the field, but not known to the authors, are also not included. Many of the measures included in the first edition of the compendium focused on individual violence-related attitudes, beliefs, and behaviors. These types of measures are included in this edition as well and may be particularly useful if you are evaluating a school-based curriculum or a community-based program designed to reduce violence among youths. Several measures to assess peer, family, and community influences have been added to the compendium. Many of these measures are from the major longitudinal and prevention research studies of youth violence being conducted in the United States.

Most of the measures in this compendium are intended for use with youths between the ages of 11 and 24 years, to assess such factors as serious violent and delinquent behavior, conflict resolution strategies, social and emotional competencies, peer influences, parental monitoring and supervision, family relationships, exposure to violence, collective efficacy, and neighborhood characteristics. The compendium also contains a number of scales and assessments developed for use with children between the ages of 5 and 10 years, to measure factors such as aggressive fantasies, beliefs supportive of aggression, attributional biases, prosocial behavior, and aggressive behavior.  When parent and teacher versions of assessments are available, they are included as well.

Read the compendium online:
Introduction
Section I. Attitude and Belief Assessments.
Section II. Psychosocial and Cognitive Assessments.
Section III. Behavior Assessments.
Section IV. Environmental Assessments.
Index
Download the entire compendium (This document is 6 mega bytes (MB) and will take a dialup connections extend time to load and download.)

Order this compendium online.

 

State Injury Profiles 2001

·                                        Related Resources

·                                 Injury Fact Book

The State Injury Profiles contain maps and tables of injury deaths and death rates for each state in the nation. The profiles also include descriptions of CDC-sponsored injury prevention programs and research activities in each state.

Note: These documents are large in file size (1-3 MB) and not recommended for download through low bandwidth (e.g., dial-up Internet connection). For an interactive, online version of the maps, visit Injury Maps.

Adobe Acrobat required to view or print the profiles.

Alabama
Alaska 
Arizona 
Arkansas 
California 
Colorado 
Connecticut
Delaware 
Florida 
Georgia 
Hawaii 
Idaho 
Illinois 
Indiana 
Iowa 
Kansas 
Kentucky 
Louisiana 
Maine 
Maryland 
Massachusetts 
Michigan 
Minnesota 
Mississippi 
Missouri 
Montana 

Nebraska 
Nevada 
New Hampshire 
New Jersey 
New Mexico 
New York 
North Carolina 
North Dakota 
Ohio 
Oklahoma 
Oregon 
Pennsylvania 
Rhode Island 
South Carolina 
South Dakota 
Tennessee 
Texas
Utah 
Vermont 
Virginia 
Washington 
Washington, D.C.
West Virginia 
Wisconsin 
Wyoming  

  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

State and Local Health Departments Links 

 

 

 

Framework for the assessment of children in need and their families – pack (from UK, but referenced for USA caseworkers to download.

http://www.dh.gov.uk/en/Publicationsandstatistics/Publications/PublicationsPolicyAndGuidance/DH_4008144

 

The assessment framework, practice guidance, questionnaires and scales, assessment recording forms

Guidance

Department of Health

15 June 2000

Professionals

ISBN 0113224257

2000

4

Crown

The development of the Framework for the Assessment of Children in Need and their Families (jointly issued by the Department of Health, the Department for Education and Employment and the Home Office, 2000) has drawn heavily, from many disciplines, on the wealth of research and accumulated practice experience about the developmental needs of children. The aim of the practice guidance is to make transparent the evidence base for the Assessment Framework, thereby assisting professionals in their tasks of analysis, judgement and decision making.

Contains four items:

(1) 'Framework for the assessment of children in need and their families', (ISBN 0 11322 310 2)

(2) 'Assessing children in need and their families: practice guidance', (ISBN 0 11322 418 4)

(3) Folder: 'Framework for the assessment of children in need and their families: the family pack of questionnaires and scales', contains 50 p publication of same title,  with 'Strengths and difficulties' questionnaire check sheet transparency, plus [40] loose pages (ISBN 0 11322 426 5);

 (4) Folder: 'Framework for the assessment of children in need and their families: Referral and initial record information record; Initial assessment record; Core assessment records; Assessment recording forms: guidance notes and glossary'; contains publication: 'Framework for the assessment of children in need and their families; guidance notes and glossary for: referral and initial information record, initial assessment record and core assessment record' (ISBN 0 11322 424 9); also contains
1 double-sided sheet, 'Referral and initial information record'
1 four-page pamphlet, 'Initial assessment record' (ISBN 0 11322 437 0)
5 'Framework for the assessment of children in need and their families' core assessment booklets, covering child age ranges: 0-2 years (ISBN 0 11322 419 2), 3-4 years, 5-9 years (ISBN 0 11322 421 4), 10-14 years (ISBN 0 11322 422 2), young person aged 15 years and over (ISBN 0 11322 423 0).

The Framework documents are available to download below, and can also be ordered from the Stationery Office.

 

 

 


 

Child Trauma Assessment

http://www.childtrauma.com/ax.html

http://www.childtrauma.com/logo2.gifChild Trauma Assessment

Here are some of our favorite child trauma measures, along with varying amounts of information and a couple of links.
Note: This page is written for mental health professionals, researchers, and students in the field.

publications - measures - order


Publications

Greenwald, R. (2004, September). Child trauma measures for research and practice. Poster session presented at the annual meeting of the EMDR International Association, Montreal.

Provides an overview of measurement issues for this population, as well as summaries of selected measures along with sample items and contact information.

Greenwald, R. & Rubin, A. (1999). Brief assessment of children's post-traumatic symptoms: Development and preliminary validation of parent and child scales. Research on Social Work Practice, 9, 61-75.

This preprint reports on the first validation studies for the Child Report of Post-traumatic Symptoms (CROPS) and the Parent Report of Post-traumatic Symptoms (PROPS). These are 1-page measures of broad-spectrum post-trauma & loss symptoms.

Greenwald, R., Rubin, A., Jurkovic, G. J., Wiedemann, J., Russell, A. M., O’Connor, M. B., Sarac, T., Morrell, T. R., & Weishaar, D. (2002, November). Psychometrics of the CROPS & PROPS in multiple cultures/translations. Poster session presented at the annual meeting of the International Society for Traumatic Stress Studies, Baltimore.

Data on the CROPS and PROPS in 5 different studies/settings.

Greenwald, R., Rubin, A., Russell, A. M., & O’Connor, M. B. (2002, November). Brief assessment of children's and adolescents' trauma/loss exposure. Poster session presented at the annual meeting of the International Society for Traumatic Stress Studies, Baltimore.

Data on the LITE in 3 different studies/settings.


Measures

PLEASE NOTE THAT THESE MEASURES ARE AVAILABLE HERE FOR EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY. THEY SHOULD NOT BE USED FOR SELF-DIAGNOSIS. IF YOU ARE CONCERNED ABOUT YOURSELF OR A FAMILY MEMBER, PLEASE CONSULT WITH A MENTAL HEALTH PROFESSIONAL.


Order

The CROPS, PROPS, LITE, and PRS are published and distributed* by Child Trauma Institute.

All packets include: hard or pdf copies, administration guide, supporting materials, and unlimited permission to copy for personal/agency use (not for re-sale).

Prices include Free Shipping. Get a discount by receiving your items by e-mail (pdf files) instead of hard copy.

CROPS & PROPS: $16

CROPS & PROPS with e-mail discount: $13

LITE-S/P: $16

LITE-S/P with e-mail discount: $13

PRS: $6

PRS with e-mail discount: $4

Combine and save - CROPS & PROPS + LITE-S/P + PRS: $32

Combine and save - CROPS & PROPS + LITE-S/P + PRS with e-mail discount: $26


Every purchase made through Child Trauma Institute supports
our activities.

 

More on Trauma

Sidran Institute

http://www.sidran.org

For Survivors and Loved Ones

http://www.sidran.org/Images/about/about_top.gif

INFORMATION, RESOURCES, AND THERAPIST LISTING FROM SIDRAN'S HELP DESK
The Trauma Resource Specialists at Sidran's Help Desk will aid you in finding a therapist, reading matter, and other resources to aid your progress toward recovery.

ARTICLES, FACT SHEETS, BROCHURES, WEBSITES
Click on an article below to read the full version.


What Is Psychological Trauma?
By Esther Giller

What Is Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)?
By Sidran Institute

Post Traumatic Stress Disorder Fact Sheet
By PTSD Alliance

Myths and Facts About PTSD

By the PTSD Alliance

What Are Traumatic Memories?
By Sidran Institute

What Is a Dissociative Disorder?
By Sidran Institute

Self Inflicted Violence/Self Abuse/Self Injury

How to Choose a Therapist for Post-Traumatic Stress and Dissociative Conditions

A Recovery Bill of Rights for Trauma Survivors
by Thomas V. Maguire, Ph.D.

Rights and Responsibilities in Psychotherapy
by Laura S. Brown, Ph.D. ABPP

PTSD and Children
By Aphrodite Matsakis, Ph.D.

PTSD and Parenting
By Patience Mason

Helping a Child Manage Fears After a Traumatic Event
By Ceridian Corporation

Dental Tips for Individuals Sexually Abused as Children
by Kate F. Hays, Ph.D. and Sheila F. Stanley, Ed.D.

Retraumatizing the Victim
By Ann Jennings, Ph.D.

Understanding Integration as a Natural Part of Trauma Recovery
By Rachel Downing, L.C.S.W.-C.

About Medications for Combat PTSD
By Jonathan Shay, M.D., Ph.D.

Parents as Partners in the Treatment of Dissociative Children
By Frances S. Waters, M.S.W.

When a Terrorist Act Occurs
By Ceridian Corporation

The Effects of DID on Children of Trauma Survivors
By Esther Giller

What the Hell Is Satanic Ritual Abuse?
by Leonard Holmes, Ph.D.

Position Statement on Services and Supports to Trauma Survivors
By the National Association of State Mental Health Program Directors

Exposure To A Traumatic Event Does Not Automatically Put A Person On A Path To Develop PTSD: The Importance of Protective Factors To Promote Resiliency.
by Carl C. Bell, M.D.

 

 

 

Assessment Tools Caseworkers Can Purchase

http://www.sidran.org

 

Dissociative Experiences Scale, II
Product ID: DES

The DES II, according to the authors, "is a brief, self-report measure of the frequency of dissociative experiences. The scale was developed to provide a reliable, valid, and convenient way to quantify dissociative experiences.  DELIVERED BY US MAIL - SHIPPING CHARGE INCLUDED IN PRICE.


More...
Our Price: $15.00
Add to Cart

 


Dissociative Features Profile
Product ID: DFP

The Dissociative Features Profile is a new instrument currently under development that can be useful to help identify dissociative pathology in children and adolescents. Research is continuing, but in an initial validation study, results suggest that this measure can select 93% of a dissociative target group (Silberg, 1996).DELIVERED BY EMAIL ONLY - NO SHIPPING CHARGE


More...
Our Price: $12.00
Add to Cart

 


Dissociative Features Profile
Product ID: DFP

The Dissociative Features Profile is a new instrument currently under development that can be useful to help identify dissociative pathology in children and adolescents. Research is continuing, but in an initial validation study, results suggest that this measure can select 93% of a dissociative target group (Silberg, 1996).DELIVERED BY US MAIL - SHIPPING CHARGE INCLUDED IN PRICE.


More...
Our Price: $15.00
Add to Cart

 


The Professional Quality of Life Scale: (ProQOL):

The Professional Quality of Life Scale: (ProQOL):
Product ID: ProQOL

Taken together, the ProQOL measures a positive thing: professional quality of life. While the negative effects of caregiving should not be minimized, viewing it from a positive perspective, supporting professional quality of life, makes it easier for organizations to support positive system change to prevent...DELIVERED BY EMAIL ONLY - NO SHIPPING CHARGE


More...
Our Price: $16.00
Add to Cart

 


The Professional Quality of Life Scale: (ProQOL):

The Professional Quality of Life Scale: (ProQOL):
Product ID: ProQOL

Taken together, the ProQOL measures a positive thing: professional quality of life. While the negative effects of caregiving should not be minimized, viewing it from a positive perspective, supporting professional quality of life, makes it easier for organizations to support positive system change to prevent...DELIVERED BY US MAIL - SHIPPING CHARGE INCLUDED IN PRICE.


More...
Our Price: $19.00
Add to Cart

 

Library Search Results

CD-42432
Assessing children's well-being : a handbook of measures.
Naar-King, Sylvie. Ellis, Deborah A. Frey, Maureen A.
Wayne State University
Book
xv, 307 p.
Copyright
Published:  2004
Publication Information: Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, Inc.
Available from:  Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.
Taylor and Francis Group, LLC. 325 Chestnut St., Suite 800
Philadelphia, PA  09106
Tel: 215-625-8900 1800-354-1420
Fax: 215-625-2940
Available From:http://www.leaonline.com/

This comprehensive reference describes a wide variety of instruments used to measure dimensions of child well-being. The assessments are grouped by category: health status and quality of life, adherence, pain management, child behavior, child development, child coping, cognitions and attitudes, environment, and consumer satisfaction. Each section includes an overview that explains theories and issues for consideration. The reviews provide information about the source, availability, purpose, standardization, reliability and validity, and publications about the measure.
Keywords:
measures; assessment; well being; child health; child development; child behavior

 

Comprehensive
Family Assessment Guidelines
for
Child Welfare

Table of Contents

View printable version (PDF - 301 KB)

1. Introduction

2. Comprehensive Family Assessment

3. Components of Comprehensive Family Assessment

4. Comprehensive Family Assessment Process

5. Administrative Supports for Comprehensive Family Assessment

6. Conclusions

7. Resources Relevant to Comprehensive Family Assessment

 

Presenedt by:

Copyright © 2002

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