Adoption

In this chapter you will find information from the Group.  Also, there is a list of compiled publications that are online for free through Child  Welfare Information Gateway.

Unfortunately, It has been found, over and over, that CPS makes false accusations of child abuse and removes children back into the System, just before adoption takes place by the foster parents.  This is a Concern for Reform.  Please see:  http://nfpcar.org   (our Group’s website) for more details and what is being done about it.

Please refer to eBook:    Standing InThe Shadow of the Law

                                                            by Marilyn Harrison

                                                http://nfpcar.org/Shadow/index.htm

 

This free, online book easily explains and puts into perspective, what is really happening on many related subjects regarding foster parenting, adoption and the law.

Note:  A “Post Adoption Agreement” or “Open Adoption Agreement” is actually prepared, signed & agreed to between the adoptive parents and the birth parents “before” the finalization of adoption.  It is called a post-adoption agreement because it goes into affect after the finalization of adoption.

Group Information on Adoption

Practical Guide to Adoption Subsidy for Adoptive Families and Advocates
by Timothy P. O'Hanlon, Ph.D.
Rev. ed. 2007
 Electronic book [RTF format]; 193 pages.  Online ebook $20.00
 
Error! Hyperlink reference not valid.
http://www.fpsol. com/adoption/ guidebook. html

Tim O'Hanlon's website which offers Contact along
with an option for his  ]article feeds...
http://www.suite101 .com/profile. cfm/tohanlon

 

Joy, from our Group fosterparentallegations

http://www.yahoogroups.com, writes:

 

Tim O’Hanlon is an Ohio subsidies advocate, who did write a book. He wasn't real encouraging or helpful when I contacted several years back to help me. I know a bit about subsidies myself if I can help. I, with the help of other subsidy guru's, have attained subsidies for 2 of my privately adopted children and know the struggles that come with it. One of our children's comes from OH which isn't great, and the other from CA which is better. Anyhow, I know a thing or 2 about subsidies if anyone needs any help, I can try and at least share what I did. I have helped others. My kids were never in county/state care, but would have been.  Privately adopted children can and do get Title IV-E, but many agencies will tell you they can't. We're proof they're wrong. They met the criteria for Title IV-E, which is federal not state, and we got it...had to struggle a little but was worth it in the long run. Anyhow, if someone needs a hand, I'll try. Take care and God bless, Joy from OH     just put Urgent Joy, SUbsidy help so I don't delete from so many emails. Thanks



Adoptions Changes Sought
http://www.topix. net/content/ kri/2007/ 12/adoptions- changes-sought

 

The following are publications compiled on

Adoption from Child Welfare Information Gateway

http://www.childwelfare.gov/

 

 

Consent to Adoption

Series Title:

State Statutes

Author(s):

Child Welfare Information Gateway

Availability:

View Publication
Download Publication (PDF - 142 KB)

Year Published:

2007 - 7 pages

 

Reviews State laws that specify the persons who must consent to a child's adoption, time frames for consent, and guidelines for revocation of consent.

Consent to Adoption: Summary of State Laws

Series Title:

State Statutes

Author(s):

Child Welfare Information Gateway

Availability:

Download Publication (PDF - 474 KB)

Year Published:

2007 - 98 pages

 

Reviews State laws that specify the persons who must consent to a child's adoption, timeframes for consent, and guidelines for revocation of consent. Summaries of laws for all States and US territories are included.

Costs of Adopting

Series Title:

Factsheets for Families

Author(s):

Child Welfare Information Gateway

Availability:

View Publication
Download Publication (PDF - 240 KB)
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Availability in Spanish:

View Publication
Download Publication (PDF - 246 KB)
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Year Published:

2004 - 5 pages

 

This factsheet provides cost estimates for domestic and intercountry adoptions. Agency fees, legal fees, home study expenses, and foreign country expenses are considered. The factsheet also includes information about adoption benefits, such as Federal tax credits, state tax credits, subsidies, and adoption loans and grants. A brief list of additional resources is provided.

 

Court Hearings for the Permanent Placement of Children

Series Title:

State Statutes

Author(s):

Child Welfare Information Gateway

Availability:

View Publication
Download Publication (PDF - 179 KB)

Year Published:

2006 - 4 pages

 

Court hearings are used to review the status and determine the permanent placement of children who have been placed in out-of-home care, including foster care. The Adoption and Safe Families Act (ASFA) of 1997 (P.L. 105-89) amended title IV-E of the Social Security Act in an effort to provide added safety and permanency for children in foster placement. ASFA placed an emphasis on expediting and improving planning and decision-making for the permanent placement of children in the child welfare system.

 

Court Hearings for the Permanent Placement of Children: Summary of State Laws

Series Title:

State Statutes

Author(s):

Child Welfare Information Gateway

Availability:

Download Publication (PDF - 424 KB)

Year Published:

2006 - 61 pages

 

Court hearings are used to review the status and determine the permanent placement of children who have been placed in out-of-home care, including foster care. The Adoption and Safe Families Act (ASFA) of 1997 (P.L. 105-89) amended title IV-E of the Social Security Act in an effort to provide added safety and permanency for children in foster placement. ASFA placed an emphasis on expediting and improving planning and decision-making for the permanent placement of children in the child welfare system. ASFA (42 U.S.C. 675(5)(B)) requires that the status of each child in foster care be reviewed at least once every ...

 

Court Jurisdiction and Venue for Adoption Petitions

Series Title:

State Statutes

Author(s):

Child Welfare Information Gateway

Availability:

View Publication
Download Publication (PDF - 166 KB)

Year Published:

2007 - 4 pages

 

Provides the laws that specify the appropriate State courts, by type and location, for handling adoption petitions.

 

Court Jurisdiction and Venue for Adoption Petitions: Summary of State Laws

Series Title:

State Statutes

Author(s):

Child Welfare Information Gateway

Availability:

Download Publication (PDF - 233 KB)

Year Published:

2007 - 24 pages

 

Provides the laws that specify the appropriate State courts, by type and location, for handling adoption petitions. Summaries of laws for all States and US territories are included.

 

Criminal Background Checks for Prospective Adoptive and Foster Parents

Series Title:

State Statutes

Author(s):

Child Welfare Information Gateway

Availability:

View Publication
Download Publication (PDF - 208 KB)

Year Published:

2006 - 6 pages

 

All States, the District of Columbia, Guam, and Puerto Rico require, in statute or regulation, background investigations of prospective adoptive and foster parents and all adults residing in prospective adoptive and foster households. Current through August 2006, this publication provides general information about States' requirements for these background checks. It also discusses crimes which may prevent individuals from being approved as a foster or adoptive parent in a State. This product is currently being updated. Check back in August 2007 for the latest information about how States address this issue in statute.

 

Criminal Background Checks for Prospective Adoptive and Foster Parents: Summary of State Laws

Series Title:

State Statutes

Author(s):

Child Welfare Information Gateway

Availability:

Download Publication (PDF - 414 KB)

Year Published:

2006 - 61 pages

 

All States, the District of Columbia, Guam, and Puerto Rico require, in statute or regulation, background investigations of prospective adoptive and foster parents and all adults residing in prospective adoptive and foster households. Current through August 2006, this publication provides general information and summaries of State law and policy (where available) regarding States? requirements for these background checks. It also discusses crimes which may prevent individuals from being approved as a foster or adoptive parent in a State. This product is currently being updated. Check back in August 2007 for the latest information about how States address this issue in ...

 

Employer-Provided Adoption Benefits

Series Title:

Factsheets for Families

Author(s):

Child Welfare Information Gateway

Availability:

View Publication
Download Publication (PDF - 226 KB)

Availability in Spanish:

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Download Publication (PDF - 232 KB)
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Year Published:

2004 - 3 pages

 

This fact sheet explains the types of employee and tax benefits that are available to adoptive parents, from financial assistance and parental leave to tax credits for adoption expenses. Eligibility for such benefits is briefly discussed, and resources about employers offering adoption benefits are provided.

 

Explaining Adoption to Your Children, Family, and Friends

Series Title:

Factsheets for Families

Author(s):

Child Welfare Information Gateway

Availability:

View Publication

Year Published:

2001 - 4 pages

 

This fact sheet provides background information about adoption and offers tips for discussing the topic with children, family members, and friends. Emphasis is placed on sensitivity, open communication, and positive adoption language. A brief list of resources for adoptive families is included.

 

Federal Title IV-E and State Adoption Assistance

Series Title:

State Statutes

Author(s):

Child Welfare Information Gateway

Availability:

View Publication
Download Publication (PDF - 197 KB)

Year Published:

2004 - 3 pages

 

Children with special needs may qualify for adoption assistance (also called "adoption subsidy") to help their adoptive families defray expenses for the child's ongoing therapies or treatment. There are two major funding sources for adoption assistance: the Federal title IV-E program under the Social Security Act and State programs, which vary from State to State. Current through June 2004, this publication provides general information on adoption assistance, including eligibility, limitations, termination, and modification. This product is currently being updated. Check back in July 2007 for the latest information about how States address this issue in statute.

 

Federal Title IV-E and State Adoption Assistance: Summary of State Laws

Series Title:

State Statutes

Author(s):

Child Welfare Information Gateway

Availability:

Download Publication (PDF - 347 KB)

Year Published:

2004 - 39 pages

 

Children with special needs may qualify for adoption assistance (also called "adoption subsidy") to help their adoptive families defray expenses for the child's ongoing therapies or treatment. There are two major funding sources for adoption assistance: the Federal title IV-E program under the Social Security Act and State programs, which vary from State to State. Current through June 2004, this publication provides general information and summaries of State laws on adoption assistance, including eligibility, limitations, termination, and modification. This product is currently being updated. Check back in July 2007 for the latest information about how States address this issue in ...

 

Foster Parent Adoption

Series Title:

Bulletins for Professionals

Author(s):

Child Welfare Information Gateway

Availability:

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Year Published:

2006 - 9 pages

 

This paper discusses issues related to the increasing importance of foster parents as permanency resources for children in foster care. In order to facilitate adoptions by foster parents, professionals should be knowledgeable about the benefits, costs, and practice issues surrounding foster parent adoption. Practice issues include assessment, adoption preparation and postadoption support, and facilitating ongoing connections with birth families.

 

Foster Parents Considering Adoption

Series Title:

Factsheets for Families

Author(s):

Child Welfare Information Gateway

Availability:

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Year Published:

2005 - 6 pages

 

This factsheet is written for foster parents who are considering adopting a child in their care. It provides information on the differences between foster care and adoption, and explores some of the things for foster parents to consider when making the decision about whether to adopt a child in their care. Additional topics discussed include: trends in foster parent adoption, benefits of foster parent adoption for all involved, characteristics of foster families who successfully adopt children in their care, and characteristics of foster families whose adoptions failed. Resources are provided.

Series Title:

General Information Packets

Author(s):

Child Welfare Information Gateway

Availability:

View Publication
Download Publication (PDF - 783 KB)

Availability in Spanish:

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Download Publication (PDF - 2,138 KB)

Year Published:

2004 - 16 pages

 

This collection of materials provides an overview of the costs involved in the adoption process as well as sources of financial assistance. The papers address the basic costs of adopting, adoption assistance for children adopted from foster care, employer-provided adoption benefits, and ways to make adoption more affordable.

 

Funding Resources for Adoption Services

Series Title:

Related Organizations Lists

Author(s):

Child Welfare Information Gateway

Availability:

View Publication

Year Published:

2008 - 0 pages

 

This resource listing provides information about federal and private agencies that offer financial assistance and information for adoption services. Each entry includes contact information and a description of the types of support it provides.

 

Getting Started: Adoption General Information Packet 1

Series Title:

General Information Packets

Author(s):

Child Welfare Information Gateway

Availability:

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Availability in Spanish:

View Publication
Download Publication (PDF - 2,393 KB)

Year Published:

2004 - 27 pages

 

This collection of factsheets published by the National Adoption Information Clearinghouse provides an overview of the adoption process. The papers address the steps involved in agency and independent adoptions, the home study process, and legal aspects of adoptions.

 

Helping Your Foster Child Transition to Your Adopted Child

Series Title:

Factsheets for Families

Author(s):

Child Welfare Information Gateway

Availability:

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Year Published:

2005 - 6 pages

 

There are a number of ways to help foster children make the emotional transition from being "a ward of the State or the Court" to being "a son or daughter" of foster/adoptive parents. This fact sheet describes specific things families can say and do to help foster children transition, including: talking with children about the changes, engaging in activities to help children understand their own history and background and the reasons why they cannot live with their birth family, helping children adjust to these losses, and helping children transfer their attachments to the foster/adoptive family. Additionally, families will need to ...

 

How Many Children Were Adopted in 2000 and 2001?

Series Title:

Numbers and Trends

Author(s):

Child Welfare Information Gateway

Availability:

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Year Published:

2004 - 31 pages

 

The purpose of this report is to estimate the number of children adopted in each of the States for 2000 and 2001 and to use these numbers to estimate the composition and trends of all adoptions in the United States. Key findings, presented in How Many Children Were Adopted in 2000 and 2001?-Highlights (http://www.childwelfare.gov/pubs/s_adoptedhighlights.cfm), include: (1) In 2000 and 2001, about 127,000 children were adopted annually in the United States; (2) Public agency and intercountry adoptions account for more than half of alladoptions; (3) Adoptions through publicly funded child welfare agencies accounted for two-fifths of all adoptions; (4) Intercountry adoptions ...

 

How Many Children Were Adopted in 2000 and 2001? -- Highlights

Series Title:

Numbers and Trends

Author(s):

Child Welfare Information Gateway

Availability:

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Year Published:

2004 - 2 pages

 

This factsheet presents highlights from the National Adoption Information Clearinghouse's full report on How Many Children Were Adopted in 2000 and 2001? The purpose of this report is to estimate the number of children adopted in each of the States for 2000 and 2001 and to use these numbers to estimate the composition and trends of all adoptions in the United States. Key findings are summarized. 2 references.

 

How to Make Adoption an Affordable Option

Author(s):

National Endowment for Financial Education

Availability:

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Year Published:

1997 - 76 pages

 

This booklet is written for people who would like to consider adoption, but are concerned that the process is beyond their means. It is also useful for those families who may not have thought about some of the financial aspects of adoption. The work reviews expenses common to most adoptions, as well as those that are unique to the adoption of waiting children, independent adoptions, and intercountry adoptions. The booklet offers suggestions for obtaining financial assistance and tax breaks available to adoptive parents, exploring 6 common myths about adoption. A summary checklist is provided for adoptive parents. A resource list ...

 

Impact of Adoption on Adopted Persons

Series Title:

Factsheets for Families

Author(s):

Child Welfare Information Gateway

Availability:

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Availability in Spanish:

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Download Publication (PDF - 246 KB)
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Year Published:

2004 - 8 pages

 

As discussion of the adoption process becomes more open and accepted in American society, and as more Americans have experience with adoption, there is also more attention focused on those involved in adoption -- the adopted person, the birth parents, and the adoptive parents (often referred to as the adoption triad or, more recently, the adoption constellation). People who have experienced adoption firsthand are coming forward to talk or write about their experiences, and researchers are conducting scientific studies to find out about the impact of adoption on all members of the adoption triad. This factsheet examines the impact of ...

 

Impact of Adoption on Birth Parents

Series Title:

Factsheets for Families

Author(s):

Child Welfare Information Gateway

Availability:

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Download Publication (PDF - 250 KB)
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Year Published:

2004 - 9 pages

 

This factsheet discusses some of the emotional issues that parents face after making the decision to place an infant for adoption, in surrendering the child, and in handling the feelings that often persist afterwards. In addition, it addresses some of the emotional issues of parents whose children are permanently removed from them and whose parental rights are terminated. This factsheet may be a helpful resource for birth parents, as well as family members, friends, and others who want to support birth parents. It may also provide some insight to adopted persons and adoptive parents who want to understand the struggles ...

 

Intercountry Adoptions Finalized Abroad

Series Title:

State Statutes

Author(s):

Child Welfare Information Gateway

Availability:

View Publication
Download Publication (PDF - 188 KB)

Year Published:

2005 - 5 pages

 

Intercountry adoptions may be finalized abroad or domestically. Most State statutes give full effect and recognition to intercountry adoptions finalized abroad. Full effect of a foreign adoption decree means that adoptive parents and adopted children have the same rights and obligations as they would have if a State court had issued the adoption decree. Recognition of a foreign adoption decree means that the decree is just as valid and binding as a decree issued by a State court. Additionally, most State statutes provide for validation of the foreign adoption or readoption of the child under State law and establish application ...

 

Intercountry Adoptions Finalized Abroad: Summary of State Laws

Series Title:

State Statutes

Author(s):

Child Welfare Information Gateway

Availability:

Download Publication (PDF - 333 KB)

Year Published:

2005 - 38 pages

 

Intercountry adoptions may be finalized abroad or domestically. Most State statutes give full effect and recognition to intercountry adoptions finalized abroad. Full effect of a foreign adoption decree means that adoptive parents and adopted children have the same rights and obligations as they would have if a State court had issued the adoption decree. Recognition of a foreign adoption decree means that the decree is just as valid and binding as a decree issued by a State court. Additionally, most State statutes provide for validation of the foreign adoption or readoption of the child under State law and establish application ...

 

Intestate Inheritance Rights for Adopted Children

Series Title:

State Statutes

Author(s):

Child Welfare Information Gateway

Availability:

View Publication
Download Publication (PDF - 165 KB)

Year Published:

2006 - 3 pages

 

Leaving a will is the best way to ensure heirs or descendants may inherit from your estate. Issues of property distribution may arise when a birth parent or adoptive parent dies without making a valid will or without naming an heir to particular property (referred to as "intestacy"). In these cases, State law determines who may inherit from whom. Laws in all 50 States, the District of Columbia, American Samoa, Guam, the Northern Mariana Islands, Puerto Rico, and the Virgin Islands specify an adopted child?s rights of inheritance from and through the adoptive and birth parents. Current through March 2006.

 

Intestate Inheritance Rights for Adopted Children: Summary of State Laws

Series Title:

State Statutes

Author(s):

Child Welfare Information Gateway

Availability:

Download Publication (PDF - 246 KB)

Year Published:

2006 - 22 pages

 

Leaving a will is the best way to ensure heirs or descendants may inherit from your estate. Issues of property distribution may arise when a birth parent or adoptive parent dies without making a valid will or without naming an heir to particular property (referred to as "intestacy"). In these cases, State law determines who may inherit from whom. Laws in all 50 States, the District of Columbia, American Samoa, Guam, the Northern Mariana Islands, Puerto Rico, and the Virgin Islands specify an adopted child?s rights of inheritance from and through the adoptive and birth parents. Current through March 2006, ...

 

Military Families and Adoption

Series Title:

Factsheets for Families

Author(s):

Child Welfare Information Gateway

Availability:

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Year Published:

2003 - 4 pages

 

Common questions about adoption of children by military personnel and their families are addressed in this factsheet. Topics include: resources for information about state laws, what to expect during the home study and the impact of deployment on the process, leave time, and cost. Postadoption services and medical benefits for adopted children also are discussed.

 

Military Families and Adoption

Series Title:

Bulletins for Professionals

Author(s):

Child Welfare Information Gateway

Availability:

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Year Published:

2003 - 7 pages

 

This bulletin explains the benefits of using military families as adoptive resources for children. It discusses the challenges in working with military families, ways these challenges have been overcome, and provides a list of resources and organizations that support families in their adoption pursuits.

 

National Adoption Directory

Author(s):

Child Welfare Information Gateway

Availability:

View Publication

Year Published:

2006 - 421 pages

 

This directory includes State-by-State contact information for a variety of adoption-related organizations and services including public and licensed private adoption agencies, support groups, State reunion registries, and more.

 

Obtaining Background Information on Your Prospective Adopted Child

Series Title:

Factsheets for Families

Author(s):

Child Welfare Information Gateway

Availability:

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Year Published:

2003 - 6 pages

 

This fact sheet explains why it is important to obtain background information about a prospective child. It discusses where a family might find background information, what questions to ask about the child's medical, family, social, and placement history, and why information may not be available. It includes a list of resources for more information.

 

Openness in Adoption

Series Title:

Factsheets for Families

Author(s):

Child Welfare Information Gateway

Availability:

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Year Published:

2003 - 6 pages

 

This factsheet describes the benefits of postadoption contact with birth parents and reviews considerations for determining the degree of openness that is most appropriate for the child. It suggests that adoptive parents consult Internet websites, books, counselors, and other parents when making decisions about open adoption. The factsheet includes a chart of the advantages and disadvantages of confidential adoptions, mediated adoptions, and open adoptions.

 

Openness in Adoption

Series Title:

Bulletins for Professionals

Author(s):

Child Welfare Information Gateway

Availability:

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Year Published:

2003 - 10 pages

 

This fact sheet defines open adoption, including information about the laws regarding open adoption and research findings about the effects of open adoption on the adoption triad. It discusses implications for agency policy around adoption openness, foster care adoptions, and when open adoption may not be in the child's best interest. It includes a list of useful web sites, books and articles for both families and professionals, and the pros and cons of each type of adoption (confidential, mediated, and open).

 

Parenting the Adopted Adolescent

Series Title:

Factsheets for Families

Author(s):

Child Welfare Information Gateway

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Year Published:

1995 - 11 pages

 

This fact sheet explores the effect of adoption on adolescent development and behavior. Identity formation, fear of abandonment, issues of control, feelings of not belonging, and desires to connect with birth families are described. The briefing also reviews the reactions of teens who were adopted at an older age and provides suggestions for parental response to problems. A list of training programs and materials is attached to the factsheet.

 

Persons Seeking to Adopt

Series Title:

Numbers and Trends

Author(s):

Child Welfare Information Gateway

Availability:

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Year Published:

2005 - 4 pages

 

Most Americans favor adoption, and many have at some point considered adoption. However, relatively few have taken concrete steps toward adopting a child, and fewer still have actually adopted a child. This factsheet examines some of the more recent statistics and trends regarding American adults who seek to adopt an infant or child.

 

Post-Legal Adoption Services For Children with Special Needs

and Their Families : Challenges and Lessons Learned

Series Title:

Grantee Lessons Learned

Author(s):

Child Welfare Information Gateway

Availability:

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Year Published:

2005 - 15 pages

 

With the goal of expanding and enhancing services to adoptive families of children with special needs, post-legal adoption services have been established in annual adoption discretionary grant announcements. Under that priority area in 1998, 15 3-year grants were awarded to increase permanency and well-being for children with special needs by preventing adoption disruption, dissolution, or out-of-home placement. This briefing paper synthesizes the final reports of those 15 projects. The projects targeted post-legal adoptive families and their children with special needs, pre-adoptive families, single adoptive parents, transracial adoptive families, kinship families. Core services included parent support and educational groups, children s ...

Postadoption Contact Agreements Between Birth and Adoptive Families

Series Title:

State Statutes

Author(s):

Child Welfare Information Gateway

Availability:

View Publication
Download Publication (PDF - 185 KB)

Year Published:

2005 - 4 pages

 

Postadoption contact agreements, sometimes referred to as cooperative adoption or open adoption agreements, are arrangements that allow some kind of contact between a child's adoptive family and members of the child's birth family after the child's adoption has been finalized. These arrangements can range from informal, mutual understandings between the birth and adoptive families to written, formal contracts. Agreements for postadoption contact or communication have become more prevalent in recent years, due to several factors: -- There is wider recognition of the rights of birth parents to make choices for their children -- Many adoptions involve older children, such as ...

 

Postadoption Contact Agreements Between Birth and Adoptive Families: Summary of State Laws

Series Title:

State Statutes

Author(s):

Child Welfare Information Gateway

Availability:

Download Publication (PDF - 308 KB)

Year Published:

2005 - 42 pages

 

Postadoption contact agreements, sometimes referred to as cooperative adoption or open adoption agreements, are arrangements that allow some kind of contact between a child's adoptive family and members of the child's birth family after the child's adoption has been finalized. These arrangements can range from informal, mutual understandings between the birth and adoptive families to written, formal contracts. Agreements for postadoption contact or communication have become more prevalent in recent years, due to several factors: -- There is wider recognition of the rights of birth parents to make choices for their children -- Many adoptions involve older children, such as ...

 

Postadoption Services

Series Title:

Factsheets for Families

Author(s):

Child Welfare Information Gateway

Availability:

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Year Published:

2006 - 10 pages

 

It is common for adoptive families to need support and services after adoption. Postadoption services can help families with a wide range of issues. They are available for everything from learning how to explain adoption to a preschooler, to helping a child who experienced early childhood abuse, to helping with an adopted teen?s search for identity. Experience with adoptive families has shown that all family members can benefit from some type of postadoption support. Families of children who have experienced trauma, neglect, or institutionalization may require more intensive services.

 

Postadoption Services

Series Title:

Bulletins for Professionals

Author(s):

Child Welfare Information Gateway

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Year Published:

2005 - 14 pages

 

All adopted children and their families can potentially benefit from services provided after the adoption is finalized. These services may include educational and informational services, clinical services, material services, and/or support services. This bulletin addresses: who benefits from postadoption services, how can postadoption services help, what postadoptive services do families need, what postadoptive services do States offer, how are postadoption services delivered, how are postadoption services funded, why evaluate postadoption services, what are the implications for practice, and what future research is needed This bulletin specifically focuses on the benefits for adopted people and adoptive parents. Includes resources.

 

A Report to Congress on Interjurisdictional Adoption of Children in Foster Care.

Author(s):

Children's Bureau

Availability:

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Year Published:

2006 - 61 pages

 

In response to a legislative requirement under the Keeping Children and Families Safe Act, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services conducted a survey of all States and territories to identify promising practices and possible strategies to overcome barriers to interjurisdictional placements. The survey was the first comprehensive compilation of current, promising strategies, and supports required to improve the interjurisdictional placement process for children in the child welfare system. This report provides background information on children in foster care, especially those for whom interjurisdictional adoptive placements are viable options, and describes key steps in the process to achieve permanent ...

 

Respite Care Services for Families Who Adopt Children with Special Needs: Synthesis of Demonstration Program Final Reports

Series Title:

Grantee Lessons Learned

Author(s):

Child Welfare Information Gateway

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Year Published:

2002 - 10 pages

 

This report synthesizes information from the final program and evaluation reports of 8 Adoption Opportunities discretionary grants programs written between 1994 and 1999. It summarizes project descriptions, lessons learned, accomplishments, and recommendations. An appendix includes project information for each of the 8 projects, including contact information, area served, target population, and evaluation activities.

 

Searching for Birth Relatives

Series Title:

Related Organizations Lists

Author(s):

Child Welfare Information Gateway

Availability:

View Publication

Year Published:

2008 - 0 pages

 

This information sheet provides contact information for organizations that support searches for birth relatives. The agencies include advocacy groups, registries, and networks for Jewish and Korean adoptive families.

 

Searching for Birth Relatives: Adoption General Information Packet 3

Series Title:

General Information Packets

Author(s):

Child Welfare Information Gateway

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Year Published:

2004 - 30 pages

 

This collection of factsheets provides an overview of the impact of adoption on birth parents and adopted persons and examines issues related to the search process. Coping skills, support groups, resources for searching, and state laws regarding access to adoption records are discussed.

 

Selecting and Working With an Adoption Therapist

Series Title:

Factsheets for Families

Author(s):

Child Welfare Information Gateway

Availability:

View Publication
Download Publication (PDF - 251 KB)
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Year Published:

2005 - 10 pages

 

Adoption has a lifelong impact on those it touches, and members of adoptive families may want professional help as concerns arise. Timely intervention by a professional skilled in adoption issues often can prevent concerns from becoming more serious problems. Professionals with adoption knowledge and experience are best suited to help families identify connections between problems and adoption and to plan effective treatment strategies. Sometimes a difficulty that a child is experiencing can be directly linked to adoption, but sometimes the connection is not readily apparent. In other situations, issues that seem on the surface to be related to adoption turn ...

 

Sibling Issues in Foster Care and Adoption

Series Title:

Bulletins for Professionals

Author(s):

Child Welfare Information Gateway

Availability:

View Publication
Download Publication (PDF - 356 KB)
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Year Published:

2006 - 15 pages

 

This bulletin explores research, intervention strategies, and resources to assist professionals in preserving connections among siblings placed in foster care. The importance and benefits of placing siblings together is discussed, and strategies are offered for addressing the barriers that often keep siblings apart. Ways to maintain sibling connections among siblings living in different homes are also described. A final section provides articles, curricula, sample State policies, and more resources to help professionals.

 

Single Parent Adoption: What You Need to Know

Series Title:

Factsheets for Families

Author(s):

Child Welfare Information Gateway

Availability:

View Publication
Download Publication (PDF - 276 KB)

Year Published:

1994 - 10 pages

 

This fact sheet examines the trend in adoptions by single parents and reviews potential obstacles to these families. Adoption sources and costs of placement also are discussed.

 

State Adoption Exchange Websites

Series Title:

Related Organizations Lists

Author(s):

Child Welfare Information Gateway

Availability:

View Publication

Year Published:

2008 - 0 pages

 

Adoption exchanges provide adoption information to educate prospective adoptive parents and connect waiting families with waiting children. This resource list provides website addresses for State adoption exchanges.

 

State Adoption Information Websites

Series Title:

Related Organizations Lists

Author(s):

Child Welfare Information Gateway

Availability:

View Publication

Year Published:

2008 - 0 pages

 

Includes website links to adoption information provided by State child welfare agencies in all 50 States and the District of Columbia. Links to State adoption information in Spanish are provided when available.

 

State Adoption Photolisting Services Websites

Series Title:

Related Organizations Lists

Author(s):

Child Welfare Information Gateway

Availability:

View Publication

Year Published:

2008 - 0 pages

 

Photolisting services provide pictures and brief descriptions of the children in the State's foster care system who are available for adoption and waiting for families. This resource list provides website addresses for State photolisting services.

 

State Adoption Program Managers

Series Title:

Related Organizations Lists

Author(s):

Child Welfare Information Gateway

Availability:

View Publication

Year Published:

2008 - 0 pages

 

Includes website links to adoption information provided by State child welfare agencies in all 50 States and the District of Columbia. Links to State adoption information in Spanish are provided when available.

 

Stay Connected to Adoption Information

Author(s):

Child Welfare Information Gateway

Availability:

View Publication
Download Publication (PDF - 226 KB)
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Year Published:

2007 - 2 pages

 

Child Welfare Information Gateway promotes the safety, permanency, and well-being of children and families by connecting adoption and other child welfare professionals to information and resources that help them address the needs of children and families in their communities. This flier highlights the resources and services that Child Welfare Information Gateway offers.

 

Stepparent Adoption

Series Title:

Factsheets for Families

Author(s):

Child Welfare Information Gateway

Availability:

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Year Published:

2004 - 3 pages

 

Although state laws differ in the procedures used to approve stepparent adoptions, most jurisdictions require the consent of the non-custodial parent as well as the stepparent's spouse. This information sheet advises stepparents to consult with an adoption attorney to determine the relevant legal requirements. The National Adoption Information Clearinghouse and state legislative web sites also provide summaries and full text copies of state adoption laws. Other steps in the adoption process include: identify the requirements of the county court that supervises adoptions, submit relevant forms, attend court hearings, and apply for an amended birth certificate.

 

Transracial and Transcultural Adoption

Author(s):

Child Welfare Information Gateway

Availability:

View Publication
Download Publication (PDF - 261 KB)

Year Published:

1994 - 10 pages

 

Written for prospective parents who wish to adopt a child from another race or culture, this factsheet describes how to prepare for transracial or transcultural adoption. Strategies for helping children to develop a strong sense of racial or cultural identity are explained, including confronting racially or ethnically-based comments from other people, celebrating cultural differences and similarities, and exposing the child to his or her culture of origin. Methods for enhancing self-esteem also are discussed.

 

Understanding Adoption Subsidies: An Analysis of AFCARS Data. Final Report.

Author(s):

United States. Dept. of Health and Human Services. Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation., Research Triangle Institute.
Dalberth, Gibbs, Berkman

Availability:

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Download Publication (PDF - 1,410 KB)
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Year Published:

2005 - 58 pages

 

Adoption subsidies are perhaps the single-most powerful tool by which the child welfare system can encourage adoption and support adoptive families. Yet little is known about the factors associated with the receipt and amount of subsidies. Data from the Adoption and Foster Care Analysis and Reporting System (AFCARS) offer an opportunity to examine how states use adoption subsidies to help achieve goals of permanency and well-being for children. Of particular interest to this study are patterns of subsidy receipt, the role of federal support for adoption subsidies under Title IV-E, and the relationship between adoption subsidies and adoption outcomes, including ...

 

Use of Advertising and Facilitators in Adoptive Placements

Series Title:

State Statutes

Author(s):

Child Welfare Information Gateway

Availability:

View Publication
Download Publication (PDF - 183 KB)

Year Published:

2006 - 4 pages

 

All States permit the placement of children for adoption by agencies, either publicly sponsored agencies, such as a department of the State government, or private child- placing agencies that have been licensed by the State. Many people choose to adopt, and many birth parents choose to place their children for adoption, without the involvement of an agency. These placements are known as private placements or independent adoptions. Private placement is often preferred by people who want to adopt newborn infants from the United States and avoid the often years-long waiting lists of adoption agencies. The challenge for prospective adoptive parents ...

 

Use of Advertising and Facilitators in Adoptive Placements: Summary of State Laws

Series Title:

State Statutes

Author(s):

Child Welfare Information Gateway

Availability:

Download Publication (PDF - 273 KB)

Year Published:

2006 - 25 pages

 

All States permit the placement of children for adoption by agencies, either publicly sponsored agencies, such as a department of the State government, or private child- placing agencies that have been licensed by the State. Many people choose to adopt, and many birth parents choose to place their children for adoption, without the involvement of an agency. These placements are known as private placements or independent adoptions. Private placement is often preferred by people who want to adopt newborn infants from the United States and avoid the often years-long waiting lists of adoption agencies. The challenge for prospective adoptive parents ...

 

Voluntary Relinquishment for Adoption

Series Title:

Numbers and Trends

Author(s):

Child Welfare Information Gateway

Availability:

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Year Published:

2005 - 4 pages

 

Voluntary placement of children for adoption is relatively rare in the United States. This paper examines some of the more recent statistics and trends regarding the relinquishment of children by birth mothers.

 

Who May Adopt, Be Adopted, or Place a Child for Adoption?

Series Title:

State Statutes

Author(s):

Child Welfare Information Gateway

Availability:

View Publication
Download Publication (PDF - 175 KB)

Year Published:

2006 - 3 pages

 

This briefing reviews State laws regarding parties to an adoption. General information dealing with who may adopt, who may be adopted, and who may place a child for adoption is identified. In order for an adoption to take place, a person available to be adopted must be placed in the home of a person or persons eligible to adopt. All States, the District of Columbia, American Samoa, Guam, Puerto Rico, the Northern Mariana Islands, and the Virgin Islands have laws that specify which persons are eligible as adopting parents and which persons can be adopted. In addition, all States, the ...

 

Who May Adopt, Be Adopted, or Place a Child for Adoption? : Summary of State Laws

Series Title:

State Statutes

Author(s):

Child Welfare Information Gateway

Availability:

Download Publication (PDF - 302 KB)

Year Published:

2006 - 36 pages

 

This briefing reviews State laws regarding parties to an adoption. Statutes dealing with who may adopt, who may be adopted, and who may place a child for adoption are identified for each State, the District of Columbia, and five territories. Previous title: Parties to an Adoption : Summary of State Laws.

 

 

 

The following is information provided by our American government through

“Children’s Bureau” regarding Adoption http://childwelfare.gov

 

The hierarchy for this information is:

Children's Bureau

Administration for Children & Families (ACF)

U.S. Department of Health & Human Services (DHHS)

 

 

From:  http://www.childwelfare.gov/adoption/

Adoption

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*                          2007 National Adoption Month

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Resources on all aspects of domestic and intercountry adoption, including adoption from foster care. Includes information for prospective and adoptive parents; information about searching for birth relatives; and resources for professionals on recruiting adoptive families, preparing children and youth, supporting birth parents, and providing postadoption services.

Overview
The adoption process, selected resources, and frequently asked questions.

National Foster Care & Adoption Directory
Provides State-by-State contact information for a variety of foster care and adoption-related organizations and services including public and licensed private adoption agencies, support groups, and more.

Types of adoption
Domestic adoption, including foster care, kinship, infant, customary, and independent/private adoptions; intercountry adoption; and interjurisdictional placement.

For prospective adoptive parents
How to adopt, the home study process, financial assistance, legal considerations, and potential challenges.

Foster care adoption
Strategies and programs, recruiting and retaining foster/adoptive families, children waiting for adoption, legal issues and laws, and National Adoption Month.

Recruiting, preparing, & retaining foster/adoptive parents
Recruiting and retaining foster and adoptive parents, including specific populations.

Preparing & supporting children & youth
Preparing and transitioning children and youth into permanent families, maintaining connections, talking about adoption, and school issues.

Supporting birth parents
Information for birth family members on adoption planning and maintaining connections with children who are adopted. Information for professionals on supporting birth parents.

Postadoption services
Adoption assistance, outcomes of postadoption services, and help for adoptive families, including understanding potential challenges and obtaining birth or adoption records.

Search & reunion
Searching for birth relatives, obtaining birth and adoption records, understanding the impact of adoption, and finding support groups.

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Related Information Gateway Topics

Systemwide: Adoption statistics
Systemwide: Cultural competence in adoption
Family-centered practice: Casework practice
Family-centered practice: Family engagement & involvement
Family-centered practice: Engaging & involving youth
Family-centered practice: Family-centered services
Systemwide: Service Array - Counseling & therapy related to specific issues
Out-of-home care: Casework practice in out-of-home care
Achieving & maintaining permanency

 

 

 

 

 

Department of Health and Human Services
Adoption Excellence Awards
2007 Nomination Guidelines

 

Thank you for your interest in the Adoption Excellence Awards. To facilitate processing, a complete nomination package must be received by COB:

Friday, August 17, 2007

Please send your nomination package to:

 

Adoption Excellence Awards
USDHHS, Children's Bureau
1250 Maryland Avenue, SW, Room 8148
Washington, DC 20024
          Attention: La Chundra Thomas

 

Selection of the Adoption Excellence Award winners for the year 2007 will be based on the contents of the nomination submission. Please review all of the guidelines and review criteria before preparing your nomination.

For the purpose of the Adoption Excellence Awards, "adoption" refers to the legal process to adopt a child from public foster care in the United States. "Excellence" is the quality of being outstanding, superior, distinguishable, or incomparably excellent.

Purpose

In the United States, there are currently 514,000 children in foster care. Of these children, 115,000 are awaiting a permanent adoptive home. These awards, presented by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), demonstrate the Department’s national commitment to expedite rebuilding the lives of those children and achieving permanency for those awaiting adoption. The Adoption Excellence Awards recognize individuals, families and organizations that share and support HHS’s priority for permanency for children in public foster care. These Awards acknowledge the leadership, innovative approaches, and dedication that significantly contribute to the successful adoption of children from foster care.

What Is The Award?

The Adoption Excellence Award is not a monetary award. Award recipients receive an engraved crystal monolith (approximately 9" tall). Engraved on the front of the monolith are the HHS logo, name of award recipient, and the category in which the recipient is honored.

Who May Nominate?

Anyone may nominate one or more candidates. Self-nominations are welcomed. Please submit a separate package for each candidate nominated.

Who May Receive These Awards?

The Department will honor States, agencies, organizations, businesses, individuals and families that have demonstrated excellence in providing stable, permanent homes for our nation’s children in foster care. Unless specifically designated in the award category description, nominees may include, but are not limited to:

1. State agencies
2. Local public agencies
3. Businesses
4. Foundations
5. Faith-based organizations
6. Media
7. Individuals
8. Child welfare organizations

9. Families
10. Courts
11. State legislatures
12. Universities
13. Tribal courts and governments
14. Advocacy organizations
15. Community-based organizations

Award Categories
When submitting a nomination package, one of the following award categories must be selected. Please indicate on the Nomination Form for which category the nomination has been made.

  1. Decrease in the Length of Time that Children in Foster Care Wait for Adoption – recognition of State(s) or public/Tribal agencies that have developed and implemented strategies which have achieved a significant decrease in the average length of stay in foster care.

  2. Increased Adoptions of Older Children – recognition of State(s) or public/Tribal agencies that have developed and implemented strategies which have significantly increased the number of children over age 8 adopted from the public foster care system.

  3. Inter-jurisdictional Adoptions – recognition of State(s) or public, Tribal, and child welfare agencies that have created strategies to overcome interjurisdictional barriers to adoption for children in foster care.

  4. Faith-Based Initiatives – recognition of faith-based organizations that have developed programs which have significantly contributed to an increase in the number of adoptions for children in foster care.

  5. Support for Adoptive Families – recognition of organizations that provide significant support to help families adopt and promote the stability of those adoptions through recruitment, preparation, training, post-placement and post-legal adoption services for adoptive families.

  6. Individual and/or Family Contributions – recognition of the personal contribution of an individual(s) professional(s), or family(ies) that promotes the adoption of children from foster care. These individuals and/or families have provided exceptional care for children or may have influenced development of better programs for children adopted from foster care.

  7. Philanthropy and/or Business Contributions – recognition of works or endeavors that promote adoption for children in foster care, such as financial aid, gifts, scholarships, or other charitable support. This category also includes businesses that promote adoption for children from foster care through activities such as partnerships, sponsorships, donations, or volunteerism.

  8. Judicial or Child Welfare System Improvement – recognition of court or public/Tribal child welfare agency system change that resulted in fewer children coming in to care or expedited the movement of children from foster care to permanency. Workforce initiatives, which have had a positive impact on systems issues, i.e. fewer children entering care and/or children remaining in care for shorter periods of time before achieving permanency, are included under this category.

  9. Adoption of Minority Children from Foster Care – recognition of State(s), public/Tribal agencies, child welfare agencies, organizations, businesses, or individuals/families that have implemented strategies which have achieved a significant impact on the adoption of minority children from foster care.

  10. Media/Public Awareness of Adoption from Foster Care – recognition of media and/or public awareness agencies or campaigns that have increased the community’s understanding of the need for permanency for children in public foster care.

What Are The Selection Criteria?

Nominations will be reviewed, judged and selected based on ten criteria. Your nomination package must include information on each of the criteria and the impact and outcomes of the nominee’s accomplishments. Nominations that demonstrate extraordinary contributions and excellence in promoting and/or increasing permanency will receive the highest consideration. Therefore, it is advised that the nomination clearly address each of the following 9 criteria:

o Collaboration/Partnerships
o Evidence-Based /Measurable Goals
o Innovation/Uniqueness
o Leadership
o Outreach
o Overall Impact/Contribution of Accomplishments to Permanency

o Use of Resources
o Ability to Replicate
o Community Involvement

What Is Included In The Nomination Package?
The nomination package MUST include the following:

  1. Nomination Form: (WORD - 26 KB) or (PDF - 66 KB) (Required): One page of identifying information on the nominator and the nominee. Here, you must also indicate the award category for the nomination (see Award Categories above).

  2. Nomination Letter (Required): Not to exceed six double-spaced pages. Letter describes the nominee's accomplishments and services in support of permanency for children in foster care. Font size should not be smaller than 10 points.

  3. Supporting Documentation (Required): Not to exceed six pages. These pages do not have to be double-spaced or recreated in double-spaced format. Supporting documentation includes letters of support, newpaper/magazine/newsletter articles, etc. Do not send video-audio tapes; they will not be reviewed or returned.

Only letters of support and material submitted in the nomination package will be accepted. All nomination materials should be sent together; materials sent under separate cover will not be considered. Audio and video tapes cannot be reviewed as part of the selection process. The complete nomination package should not exceed 12 pages (not including the Nomination Form). Any pages that exceed the 12-page limit will not be reviewed.

How Will Award Winners Be Selected?

Awards will be made in the ten categories listed under Award Categories. Multiple awards may be given in each category. Nominations will be reviewed and awardees recommended by a panel of recognized experts in the adoption field, including members from Federal and State agencies. Award recommendations will be based on the Selection Criteria (see above) and on those nominations that clearly demonstrate innovation, leadership, and excellence. Final recommendations will be submitted to the Assistant Secretary for the Administration for Children and Families (ACF). Awards will be distributed and recipients recognized in November or December 2007 at a ceremony in Washington, DC.

 

For more information about the awards and past recipients,
visit the Children's Bureau website,
http://www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/cb/initiatives/aeawards.htm or contact
La Chundra Thomas, at (202) 205-8252 or
lachundra.thomas@acf.hhs.gov.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
ADDITIONAL INFORMATION TO BE ADDED

International Adoption and Attitude Checks
Diary Entry by Amy Kirsten Burt (about the author)
Reference Link: http://www.opednews.com/populum/diarypage.php?did=14548

A deep look at international adoption from the eyes of an domestic adoptee. The article is directed at adoptive parents in hopes that they will learn from their experiences.

::::::::

Pound Pup Legacy creator, Niels, has an excellent blog post about current United States Legislation. Ethica and PEAR have also issued their comments about that same legislation. For those that are not familiar with Pound Pup Legacy, it is an organization that tracks all news, legislation, press releases, and documentation about adoption, foster care, and child welfare around the country. It is a huge source of important information for not just adoptees, but also birth parents and adoptive parents.

I recently was interviewed by an Australian News producer. She asked me some tough questions. One of which is why do I think that this situation is occurring. I think that we as Americans have become too entitled. We as Americans think that we are entitled to another person's child or another country's children. I am going to get slammed for it by adoptive parents who are beginning the process. I feel that the adoption industry encourages this. In fact, with this Families for Orphans legislation, we are actively fighting to continue this entitlement. After speaking with several adoptive parents whose views have changed, they want to burst that little bubble as this adoptive parent states.

We have become so hell bent on getting children that we are not stopping to think about the effect on them. We have not learned our lessons as a country. We have not learned the important lessons from the Masha Allen story. There are still stories of children being adopted for sexual and deviant reasons. It is now becoming customary to not mention the adoption agency in many of these sexual abuse cases. Just look at this preacher in Texas. What about this fellow out of Boerne, Texas? The list of abused children by their adoptive parents is long. Why isn't the adoption industry held accountable for placing these children in unsafe environments?

One piece of legislation is very disconcerting to say the least is the Families for Orphans legislation. The blog post that I mentioned describes how the United States will define “orphan.” That bothers me a great deal because it puts a serious damper on any kind of family preservation. It opens the door for the United States to give money to countries in exchange for their children.

This is how Niels explains the changing definition of orphan:
 

So unless a child is either living with parents (both original and adopted) that are deemed fit, or is living under legal guardian ship or legal kinship care,itis an orphan and a result can be labeled adoptable for domestic families and American families.
 

By this definition all children in foster care anywhere in this world, whose parents have lost their parental rights are orphans andthe same is true for all children living with family members other than their original parents, where that arrangement has not been sanctioned by a court order. Usingthat definition, the estimated 132 million orphans as counted by UNICEF is probably conservative, not having taken into account all children in rich countries to whom this orphan definition applies.
 

This legislation screams alarm bells. This legislation is also written by members of some of the biggest adoption industry lobbyists in this country. In fact, they have create websites such as Orphan Sunday in order to push more Christians to adopt in the name of the Lord. They have even issued press releases to push their agenda further. Adopting to save a child is not a good thing. It is involving religious values in other countries. False promises are being made to the birth families along with the country of origins. These promises can not be kept by the adoption industry nor the adoptive parents. This leads to abusive situations and resentments. All these religious organizations are doing is promoting the bottom line of a multi-billion dollar adoption industry that does not have the best interests of those living adoption in mind while creating these types of legislative bills. They have only their bottom line in mind with these situations.

I wonder if any of these religious leaders have even looked at the financial records connected to many of the organizations involved in this little venture and legislation. Do the legislators of this country realize the monetary connections with these organizations? Do they realize the amount of money going to these organizations? Have they checked Guidestar? Have they checked with the Secretary of State documentation with any of these organizations? Probably not. So for the adoptive parents considering these agencies, lets have a look:

 

  • National Council for Adoption's(NCFA) gross earnings were $2,369,236 of which government funding included $677,006 on their 2008 IRS Form 990. Keep in mind their member agencies also help contribute to making these bills pass.
     

  • Buckner International which is connected to the other Buckner services in Texas earned $20,646,446 on their 2007 IRS Form 990s. Some of their other entities received state and federal funding for their participation in the foster care system in Texas. This organization is also a member of the NCFA along with Gladney (which earns $17,000,000 on average per year) and their partner Dillon International.
     

  • Joint Council for International Children Services (JCICS) earned $530,494 which came from direct donations and membership dues on their 2007 IRS Form 990.

  • Institute for Orphan Advocacy is connected to America World Adoption Association which earned $5,226,794 according to its 2007 IRS Form 990s. America World Adoption Association also shares office space with Christian Alliance for Orphans.
     

  • Christian Alliance for Orphans does not have any IRS Form 990s on file with Guidestar. Its membership contains many of the Christian adoption agencies in the United States.
     

  • Equality for Adopted Children (EACH) is also not listed on Guidestar. This organization has heavy connections to the oil industry of Oklahoma courtesy of Senator Don Nickles.
     

  • KidSave International earned $2,823,048 in gross earnings. They also received $422,484 in federal funding.
     

  • World Wide Orphan Foundation earned $3,247,384 on their 2006 IRS Form 990 which included $688,299 to care for the children in orphanages in other countries.
     

If an organization is receiving funding from federal and state governments, I consider this taxation without representation. The adoption industry has been given a power of authority over the very people living adoption. Wiith all of these adoption industry organizations being heavily involved, there is now a name for this group, Families for Orphans Coalition. Only it should not be called Families but the Adoption Industry for Orphans Coalition.

There are two organizations that need mentioning as well. They are part of the connection involved with these other organizations as well.
 

  • Hope for Orphans which is a sub organization for Family Life is an organization that promotes international adoption by using Christian Churches and compelling their memberships to adopt for Christ. This organization also has heavy ties to the adoption industry. This organization does not have IRS form 990. I wonder if their organization is connected to churches and if they are listing their activities on their 990s. This could constitute affecting legislation which is against IRS rules for a non profit organization with religious tendencies.
     

  • Cry of the Orphan is another agency that is similar to Hope for Orphans. It has a huge membership of adoption agencies.
     

Adoption has become the taboo subject. No one wants to tackle the serious issues behind adoption. At the adoption industry's urging, the states keep many of these cases sealed from its participants and the public eye. They keep the participants in adoption separate and at each other's throats. It is time that reform is made in adoption. It is time to make it transparent for its participants. Parents who adopt internationally are not given complete backgrounds on the children that they adopt. The adoption industry should be held accountable for their facilitators in other countries. These countries need to give fully documented information to prospective adoptive parents. Foster parents have the same issues. Both of these situations often result in disruptions. Adoptive parents as well as prospective adoptive parents are not given adequate counseling and training other than a few books to read. They are not given all of the tools needed to parent their adopted children. If this is honestly about the child, we need to give the tools to those adoptive parents to succeed. The adoption industry must stop looking at its bottom line.

The adoption industry must also stop making empty promises to the birth parents of this country as well as other countries. Ethiopia has adoption agencies such as Christian World Adoptions making promises to the birth parents in that country that they will hear from their relinquished children. They do this for the exact same reason as they do it here in the United States with American birth parents. They want to profit off the relinquished children. Just consider Kathryn Joyce's article, Shotgun Adoption. This article references many of these same adoption agencies.

I have not even begun to speak about adoptees. Many of these organizations promote adoption as the panacea for abortion. Abortion denies a human being life but adoption denies them liberty and the pursuit of happiness. We must restore the constitutional rights to adoptees in this country. Right now, it is the adoption industry that is denying the right to privacy to birth parents, adoptees, and adoptive parents. Right now it is the adoption industry that is denying the right to free association to birth parents, adoptees, and adoptive parents. Right now it is the adoption industry that is violating the United States Privacy Act of 1974 with respect to birth parents, adoptees, and adoptive parents. Right now the adoption industry is violating several Supreme Court decisions with respect to birth parents, adoptees, and adoptive parents. What are those decisions? Roe vs. Wade and Griswold vs. Connecticut both defined the right to privacy to mean the right to be free from governmental interference. Brown vs. Board of Education declared separate is not equal. It is the 44 states all over the country that is giving governing power to the adoption industry over those living adoption.

I am asking the prospective adoptive parents of the United States to please stop and think about your actions. Are you encouraging this kind of entitlement? Religion can not be a key reason that you adopt. Servicing your religious beliefs will not help you or that child that you are adopting. Its okay to want to be a parent but we can not do so at the expense of a child. As a prospective adoptive parent, are you willing to fight for your adopted children's rights? Their right to their identity, their right to their heritage and culture, and their right to their original birth certificates are very important rights. Do you love your child enough to do that? When you ask for this secrecy/confidentiality, it hurts you and your adopted child. It also encourages corruption in adoption. We have to stop this now. Check those links. You too will see the connections.

 

 

Take action -- click here to contact your local newspaper or congress people:
Oppose Families for Orphans Act 2009

Click here to see the most recent messages sent to congressional reps and local newspapers

I am an Indiana adoptee living in the wilds of adoption. As an adoptee, I did my search almost four years ago. What started as a search ended up being a four year research project into adoption. Adoption encompasses many topics. It often (more...)
 

The views expressed in this article are the sole responsibility of the author
and do not necessarily reflect those of this website or its editors.

Reference Link: http://www.opednews.com/populum/diarypage.php?did=14548

 

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