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"The laws and Constitution are designed to survive, and remain in force, in extraordinary times. Liberty and security can be reconciled; and in our system they are reconciled within the framework of the law."

More discussion on: 4th amendment
 

Dear Congress

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Explore the Constitution

These  links are provided  for all to explore our US Constitution.

The United States Constitution

These are links to a couple of Constitution audio stories and a pdf file you might like.

 How the Supreme Court Judges are Chosen for Your State?
http://www.statecourtsguide.com/ 

Method of Selection

  • Judicial Election
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Take Either Constitution Quiz

1. Hillsdale College: Many Americans know the Constitution well -- they understand how it protects their freedoms and paved the way for a great nation to be built. But many more Americans don't know enough about it. How much do you know about the Constitution?  https://secure.hillsdale.edu/2015/constitution-quiz/

2. Intercollegiate Studies Institute: Full Civic Literacy Exam (from our 2008 survey)- Are you more knowledgeable than the average citizen? The average score for all 2,508 Americans taking the following test was 49%; college educators scored 55%. Can you do better? Questions were drawn from past ISI surveys, as well as other nationally recognized exams. http://www.americancivicliteracy.org/resources/quiz.aspx

The article from Hillsdale College about their Quiz:

For the last two years, ISI (Intercollegiate Studies Institute) has assessed the civil literacy of young people at American colleges and universities, testing both students and faculty. The civics test included a cross section of multiple-choice questions about our system of government, history and free enterprise -- questions to assess the knowledge that all Americans should possess in order to understand their civic responsibility and make informed decisions in matters such as elections.

More than 14,000 freshmen and seniors at 50 schools nationwide were given the 60-question exam. More than 50 percent of freshmen and 54 percent of seniors failed the test. (So they get dumber?)

This year, ISI went beyond the "institutions of higher learning" to assess civic literacy across demographic groups. The 2008 civics quiz asked similar questions to those asked to college and university students in previous years, but also included questions about civic participation and policy issues. The results were then subjected to multivariate regression analysis in order to determine if college and university graduates had a higher civic IQ than the rest of society.

As you might expect, 71 percent of Americans failed the test, with an average score of 49. Educators did not fare much better, scoring an average of 55 percent. As the researchers noted, "Fewer than half of all Americans can name all three branches of government, a minimal requirement for understanding America's constitutional system."

College grads flunked, answering 57 percent of the questions correctly, compared to 44 percent for high school grads.

Less than 24 percent of those with college degrees knew that the First Amendment prohibits establishing an official religion for the United States. Further, only 54 percent can correctly identify the basic tenets of the free enterprise system.

Would you be shocked to know that elected officials have a lower civic IQ than the public they ostensibly serve? Indeed, these paragons of representative government answered just 44 percent of the questions correctly. Almost a third of elected officials could not identify "life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness" as the inalienable rights in our Declaration of Independence.

Our Founders, those venerable Patriots who signed our Declaration of Independence and codified the liberty that is declared in our Constitution, understood that liberty could not long survive an epidemic of ignorance.

According to George Washington: "The best means of forming a manly, virtuous, and happy people will be found in the right education of youth. Without this foundation, every other means, in my opinion, must fail."

John Adams wrote: "Liberty cannot be preserved without a general knowledge among the people, who have a right, from the frame of their nature, to knowledge, as their great Creator, who does nothing in vain, has given them understandings, and a desire to know; but besides this, they have a right, an indisputable, unalienable, indefeasible, divine right to that most dreaded and envied kind of knowledge; I mean, of the characters and conduct of their rulers. ... Wisdom and knowledge, as well as virtue, diffused generally among the body of the people, being necessary for the preservation of their rights and liberties..."

Thomas Jefferson insisted: "Enlighten the people, generally, and tyranny and oppressions of body and mind will vanish like spirits at the dawn of day. ... If a nation expects to be ignorant -- and free -- in a state of civilization, it expects what never was and never will be."

James Madison agreed: "A people who mean to be their own Governors, must arm themselves with the power which knowledge gives. ... What spectacle can be more edifying or more seasonable, than that of Liberty and Learning, each leaning on the other for their mutual & surest support?"

Our Member's Comments: (Panda Bear)
If you would like to take the test, go to http://www.americancivicliteracy.org/resources/quiz.aspx

I got 30 out of 33 right, or 90.91%. Not bad, even if I do say so myself! 
Now to make sure my kids obtain the same knowledge! 

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Thomas Jefferson's Words of Wisdom

I found this information to be interesting.  These men who formed America's governing system, really knew what they were doing:

Thomas Jefferson in some cases could be called a prophet.... But in reality, he was a great historian. Check out this statement from one even earlier in history>> See Statement

When we get piled upon one another in large cities, as in Europe, we shall become as corrupt as Europe .
Thomas Jefferson

The democracy will cease to exist when you take away from those who are willing to work and give to those who would not.
Thomas Jefferson

It is incumbent on every generation to pay its own debts as it goes. A principle which if acted on would save one-half the wars of the world.
Thomas Jefferson

I predict future happiness for Americans if they can prevent the government from wasting the labors of the people under the pretense of taking care of them.
Thomas Jefferson

My reading of history convinces me that most bad government results from too much government.
Thomas Jefferson

No free man shall ever be debarred the use of arms.
Thomas Jefferson

The strongest reason for the people to retain the right to keep and bear arms is, as a last resort, to protect themselves against tyranny in government.
Thomas Jefferson

The tree of liberty must be refreshed from time to time with the blood of patriots and tyrants.
Thomas Jefferson

To compel a man to subsidize with his taxes the propagation of ideas which he disbelieves and abhors is sinful and tyrannical.
Thomas Jefferson


Very Interesting Quote.  
 In light of the present financial crisis, it's  interesting to read what Thomas Jefferson said in 1802:

Note: The following quote is in debate as to if Thomas Jeffereson every stated this. 1) No documents of his writing this (discussion: http://www.monticello.org/site/jefferson/private-banks-quotation); 2) The terms "inflation" and "deflation" were allegedly not used at this time, although the earliest definition was:
mid-14c., from L. inflationem (nom. inflatio), noun of action from inflare "blow into, puff up," from in- "into" + flare "to blow" (see blow (v.1)). Monetary sense of "enlargement of prices" (originally by an increase in the amount of money in circulation) first recorded 1838 in Amer.Eng. (Link: http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/inflation )

'I believe that banking institutions are more dangerous to our liberties than standing armies. If the American people ever allow private banks to control the issue of their currency, first by inflation, then by deflation, the banks and corporations that will grow up around the banks will deprive the people of all property until their children wake-up homeless on the continent their fathers conquered.'

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Does History Repeat Itself??

The budget should be balanced, the Treasury should be refilled, public debt should be reduced, the arrogance of officialdom should be tempered and controlled, and the assistance to foreign lands should be curtailed ..............
 Now Read the Rest Below....



lest Rome become bankrupt.... People must again learn to work, instead of living on public assistance. - Cicero, Circa 50 B.C.

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Exploring Constitutional Law
by Doug Linder (2008)

This site explores some of the great issues and controversies that surround our Nation's founding document.
  • For documents and information relating to the history of the Constitution, jump directly to History. Or see Images.
  • To learn about the Supreme Court (including its history and current cases) and the justices who have served on it, jump to Supreme Court. There's even a Supreme Court Humor Page.
     
  • To see how justices have divided on recent landmark cases, go to Landmark Cases.
     

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PROPOSED TEXT OF THE AMENDMENT

SECTION 1
The liberty of parents to direct the upbringing and education of their children is a fundamental right.

SECTION 2
Neither the United States nor any state shall infringe upon this right without demonstrating that its governmental interest as applied to the person is of the highest order and not otherwise served.

SECTION 3
No treaty nor any source of international law may be employed to supersede, modify, interpret, or apply to the rights guaranteed by this article.

To Link of Petition: https://www.parentalrights.org/petition
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Public Law 108-477

SEC. 111. (a) The head of each Federal agency or department shall—

(1) provide each new employee of the agency or department with educational and training materials concerning the United States Constitution as part of the orientation materials provided to the new employee; and

(2) provide educational and training materials concerning the United States Constitution to each employee of the agency or department on September 17 of each year.

(b) Each educational institution that receives Federal funds for a fiscal year shall hold an educational program on the United States Constitution on September 17 of such year for the students served by the educational institution.

Original Documentation can be found at the following url on page 4:
http://www.gpoaccess.gov/serialset/creports/pdf/108-792/108-792_p537-638_divj.pdf

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Name: Jay Darton Daugherty

Born: April 3, 1965

Age: 46

Marriages: 3

Children: 4 + 8 kids from wives previous relationships

Beliefs: Born Again Christian

Comments: I have made mistakes in my past

Quote: I create solutions not false promises

Resolve: I do not like to fail so I keep working at problems.

City of birth: Murray, Utah

Where I live: Price, Utah

Have preached at 4 different churches Bread of Life, Living Waters, First Baptist Price, and First Baptist Wellington

Have donated a lot of time helping the elderly.

Have donated time helping handicap people.

Donated time helping clean up the Kaysville, Utah mudslide.

Helped fire fighters put out a haystack on fire.

Saved a kid that was rock climbing from falling off a cliff.  Had to "drag" him back to safety.

I am a PLC for Carbon County Utah for Govabuse.com

I am head PLC for the state of UTAH for Govabuse.com.

Have run 12 step programs.

Have run support groups for addicts.

Advocate for family rights.

Advocate for grand parents rights.

Believe in solutions not just fixing things with a bandage'.

Whatever I do I try to do my best.

I am tired of the political system.

I believe "We the People" have been ignored long enough.

I believe we all have skeletons in our closet but rather than spend millions to erase my past I choose to move forward and learn from my past.  I am just a person.  One of We the People.  Not rich, or looking to line my pockets, or looking to be bought.  I am one of us.

 

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  Thomas Jeffereson Bank Quote:

Private Banks (Quotation)

Quotation: "If the American people ever allow private banks to control the issue of their currency, first by inflation, then by deflation, the banks and corporations that will grow up around them will deprive the people of all property until their children wake up homeless on the continent their Fathers conquered...I believe that banking institutions are more dangerous to our liberties than standing armies... The issuing power should be taken from the banks and restored to the people, to whom it properly belongs."

Variations:

  1. "If the American people ever allow private banks to control the issue of their currency, first by inflation, then by deflation, the banks and corporations that will grow up around them will deprive the people of all property until their children wake up homeless on the continent their Fathers conquered."
  2. "I believe that banking institutions are more dangerous to our liberties than standing armies..."
  3. "The issuing power should be taken from the banks and restored to the people, to whom it properly belongs."

Sources consulted: Searching on the phrase "private banks"

  1. Monticello website
  2. Ford's Works of Thomas Jefferson
  3. L&B (CD-ROM version)
  4. UVA EText Jefferson Digital Archive: Jeffersonian Cyclopedia, Thomas Jefferson on Politics and Government, Texts by or to Thomas Jefferson from the Modern English Collection
  5. Thomas Jefferson Papers at the Library of Congress
  6. Thomas Jefferson Retirement Papers
  7. Quotable Jefferson (searching in the index under "banks")
  8. Bartleby.com: Quotations

Earliest known appearance in print: 1937[1][2]

Other attributions: None known.

Status: This quotation is at least partly spurious; see comments below.

Comments: This quotation is often cited as being in an 1802 letter to Secretary of the Treasury Albert Gallatin, and/or "later published in The Debate Over the Recharter of the Bank Bill (1809)."

The first part of the quotation ("If the American people ever allow private banks to control the issue of their currency, first by inflation, then by deflation, the banks and corporations that will grow up around them will deprive the people of all property until their children wake up homeless on the continent their Fathers conquered") has not been found anywhere in Thomas Jefferson's writings, to Albert Gallatin or otherwise. It is identified in Respectfully Quoted as spurious, and the editor further points out that the words "inflation" and "deflation" are not documented until after Jefferson's lifetime.[3]

The second part of the quotation ("I believe that banking institutions are more dangerous to our liberties than standing armies...") may well be a paraphrase of a statement Jefferson made in a letter to John Taylor in 1816. He wrote, "And I sincerely believe, with you, that banking establishments are more dangerous than standing armies; and that the principle of spending money to be paid by posterity, under the name of funding, is but swindling futurity on a large scale."[4]

The third part of this quotation ("The issuing power should be taken from the banks and restored to the people, to whom it properly belongs") may be a misquotation of Jefferson's comment to John Wayles Eppes, "Bank-paper must be suppressed, and the circulating medium must be restored to the nation to whom it belongs." [5]

Lastly, we have not found a record of any publication called The Debate Over the Recharter of the Bank Bill. There was certainly debate over the recharter of the National Bank leading up to its expiration in 1811, but a search of Congressional documents of that period yields none of the verbiage discussed above.

See this article's Discussion page for further insight into the formation and use of the latter portion of this quotation.

Footnotes

  1. United States Congress. Senate. Committee on Agriculture and Forestry, Committee on Agriculture and Forestry, General Farm Legislation: Hearings Before a Subcommittee of the Committee on Agriculture and Forestry, United States Senate, Seventy-fifth Congress, Second Session, Pursuant to S. Res. 158, a Resolution to Provide for an Investigation of Agricultural Commodity Prices, of an Ever-normal Granary... (Washington, D.C.: GPO, 1937), 3607.
  2. To establish the earliest appearance of this phrase in print, the following sources were searched for the phrase, "If the American people ever allow private banks to control the issue of their currency": Google Books, Google Scholar, Amazon.com, Internet Archive, America's Historical Newspapers, American Broadsides and Ephemera Series I, Early American Imprints Series I and II, Early English Books Online, Eighteenth Century Collections Online, 19th Century U.S. Newspapers, American Periodicals Series Online, JSTOR.
  3. Suzy Platt, ed., Respectfully Quoted: A Dictionary of Quotations Requested from the Congressional Research Service (Washington D.C.: Library of Congress, 1989; Bartleby.com, 2003), http://www.bartleby.com/73/1204.html.
  4. Thomas Jefferson to John Taylor, Monticello, 28 May 1816. Ford 11:533.
  5. Thomas Jefferson to John Wayles Eppes, Monticello, 24 June 1813. Ford 11:303.

Further Sources

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